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The Democracy Commitment is the leading national organization focused on the civic education of community college students.   To such an end, TDC  is an excellent source of information on community college curricular change, how community colleges are educating and engaging students in our democracy, and ensuring that community college voices are heard and do matter in our society.  TDC National Office aims to expand public and student civic knowledge and understanding. Welcome to the National Newsroom

What's New with TDC

The quarterly newsletter from TDC’s National Office is published at least once every semester and contains updates on TDC’s latest work, announcements, opportunites, and news from member institutions.  See below for the most recent issues and archives of previous issues.

National Blog

Our national blog contains important news, updates, announcements, and opportunities from TDC National’s Office on a weekly basis.  Sign up for the mailing list to receive notifications when they posted and check it out frequently to stay up to date.  Contact the national director for opportunities to contribute.

Engage the Election 2016 Webinar: Engaging Student Voters in a Modern Democracy

Engage the Election 2016 Webinar: Engaging Student Voters in a Modern Democracy

Join the TurboVote team and campus partners for “Voter Registration & Campus Technology: Engaging Student Voters by the Thousands.” The webinar takes place on Wednesday, August 24 from 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EDT as a part of the ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 series. RSVP here.


turbovote-logo1Voting is the most basic form of civic participation we have in our democracy—one person, one vote. No matter political stance, line of work, or station in life, everyone can support the fundamental notion that conducting regular, nonpartisan elections furthers that idea. If a democracy that represents us all is the ultimate aim, a more inclusive democracy is the way to achieve it. Institutions of higher education have a valuable role to play in reaching that goal.

In fact, most colleges and universities have an obligation to promote civic participation by actively supporting their students in the voting process:

● A Dear Colleague letter from the Department of Education, released in summer 2013, reminds leaders of a provision included in section 487(a)(23) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 that specifically requires institutions to distribute voter registration forms to their students.

● The federal Higher Education Amendments of 1998 also requires colleges to make a “good faith effort” to distribute registration materials on their campuses.

For many of you, I suspect this information is not new nor are you interested in simply meeting minimum requirements. I imagine the question of “What could a ‘good faith effort’ look like?” is the more exciting – perhaps, daunting – unknown. While our shared goal of increasing youth civic participation brings us together, what brings us to the next level?

At Democracy Works, the home of TurboVote, we hope to answer that question. TurboVote is an application that makes voting easy. When you sign up, we keep track of your elections, local and national, and send you email/text reminders about important deadlines and dates. If you need to get registered, update your voter registration, or request an absentee ballot, we’ll get you all the forms and information you need, when you need them.

We connect with colleges and universities that use TurboVote everyday to talk strategy, new ideas, and, my favorite topic, how to improve our democracy. An equally valuable part of those conversations is acknowledging the difficulty of this work. From bureaucratic red tape to tabling fatigue, increasing voter registration on college campuses is difficult. Doing so in a way that has a dramatic, measurable impact is even harder.

To fulfill the spirit of the Higher Education Act, we need to embed voter resources into student life. We must institutionalize voter registration efforts on campus so democratic participation becomes second nature to all student voters.

In the first months of 2016, TurboVote partners across the country went to work conducting and aggregating research to identify best practices for integrating voter registration with campus web infrastructure. With funding support from the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Foundation, TurboVote conducted our IT Integration Study to answer two main questions: What is the IT landscape of communication and education technology on campus communities? How does that relate to campus voter registration and engagement?

Our lead research team out of the University of North Georgia constructed a survey to be administered at a variety of higher education institutions. Survey respondents came from six target groups: IT, academic affairs, student affairs, communications, faculty, and student organizations. 24 TurboVote partner campuses participated in the study in an effort to uncover both the opportunities and obstacles to IT integration.

We learned classroom integrations, links within student portals, and mass emails are the best opportunities for collaboration with IT departments to promote voter registration. Dedicated staff and students are key to starting the conversation on campus and engaging stakeholders who, we learned, are willing to give this a try. We were excited to share our findings and see what next steps campus partners might take.

Little did we know, TurboVote implementers across the country quickly traded in steps for serious leaps. At Lone Star College in Texas, Director of the Center for Civic Engagement Dr. Theis worked with IT staffers to include a call-to-action banner on their student portal to register through TurboVote. Their TurboVote site has since seen over 1,600 signups.

Beginning in fall 2016, all Harvard undergraduate students will have the opportunity to register to vote, request an absentee ballot, or sign up for election reminders as a part of their mandatory online “check in” process. Executive Director of the Harvard Institute of Politics (IOP) Cathy McLaughlin spearheaded the effort on campus enlisting the help of the Harvard Registrar’s Office and Oracle, provider of PeopleSoft Campus Solutions.

As the fall election draws near, many other campuses are pushing the ball forward and working to integrate voter registration into the portals and pass-throughs students use everyday. We’re excited to share their success stories and personal experiences with the hopes of empowering many more institutions to raise the bar for voter engagement. After all, if we can embed voter registration in this way, we can greatly strengthen our efforts in other valuable areas of this work: voter education, mobilization, and creating all-around engaged citizens. Then, we won’t just be meeting federal requirements; We’ll be helping to create a more inclusive democracy.

Join the TurboVote team and campus partners for Voter Registration & Campus Technology: Engaging Student Voters by the Thousands. The webinar takes place on Wednesday, August 24 from 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EDT as a part of the ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 series. RSVP here. We hope to see you there!

Meet the New TDC Interim National Manager

Greetings TDC!!

HallOfJustice_VerdisRobinson_Students_LawLibrary_TUV2746I just wanted to take a moment and introduce myself.  My name is Verdis LeVar Robinson, and I have joined the leadership team of TDC as the Interim National Manager after serving as a tenured Assistant Professor of History and African-American Studies having taught writing-intensive, web-enhanced, service-learning courses at Monroe Community College (MCC) in Rochester, New York, for ten years. In addition to serving as MCC’s TDC Campus Coordinator since the beginning of the initiative, I have served on TDC National Steering Committee and on the Advisory Council for its Economic Inequality Initiative.  Also, at MCC, I have served a co-advisor for Damon City Campus’ Black Student Union as well as mostly recently the Governance Advisor for the campus’ student government.  I have also created an initiative to overturn jury underrepresentation which I am striving to emulate nationally.

Professionally, I am a fellow of the Aspen Institute’s Faculty Seminar on Citizenship and the American and Global Polity, the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Faculty Seminar on Rethinking Black Freedom Studies: The Jim Crow North and West, and most recently, the Institution of Research in African-American Studies’ Summer Teachers and Scholars Institute at Columbia University exploring Black New York.

HallOfJustice_VerdisRobinson_Students_Courtroom_TUV2734

Additionally, I am the founder of the Rochester Neighborhood Oral History Project that created a walking tour of the community most impacted by the 1964 Race Riots, which has engaged over 300 members of Rochester community in discussion, learning, and walking the block.  I hold a B.M. in Voice Performance from Boston University, a B.S. and an M.A. in History from SUNY College at Brockport, and an M.A. in African-American Studies from SUNY University at Buffalo.  I am also a genealogist and Public Scholar with the New York Council for the Humanities.

Joseph Ave Walking Tour Recreation Photos-2437

As the Interim National Manager, I am here to help you through every step of The Democracy Commitment involvement; to connect you with materials, individuals, or ideas that will help your institution best approach civic learning and democratic engagement; and to create, promote, and disseminate opportunities to participate in national projects and initiatives.

We have great work ahead of us, and I am fully committed to this service.  I look forward to serving this initiative, so please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions, concerns, comments, or just to chat.   I want to get to know each one of you and your respective colleges in an effort to ensure that all community college students graduate with an education in citizenship and the democratic practice.

This work is more important than ever before, and I thank you for your commitment to democracy.

Cheers!!

Verdis L. Robinson, Interim National Manager, The Democracy Commitment (TDC)
, 1307 New York Avenue, NW, Fifth Floor Washington, DC 20005-4701 | robinsonv@aascu.org | 202.478.4656

 

Is Your Campus ALL IN?

all-in

Research suggests that while college students are passionate about social issues and eager to be a part of something larger than themselves, that passion too often does not translate to voting. AASCU member campuses take seriously their commitment – as expressed through our American Democracy Project – to prepare students to be informed, engaged citizens for our democracy and have made major strides to ensure that civic learning and opportunities for meaningful community engagement are pervasive, but there is still a real need for increased student democratic engagement.

That is why the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge was created – to facilitate and accelerate student engagement in our electoral processes and civic life. This national, non-partisan initiative recognizes campuses for their commitment to improving democratic engagement, increasing student voter participation rates, and graduating students with a lifelong commitment to being informed and active citizens. AASCU and The Democracy Commitment are proud to support this important effort and excited that many campuses have already signed up!

If your campus has already joined the ALL IN Challenge (view list here), congratulations on being ALL IN! If not, AASCU and Zaneeta Daver, director of the ALL IN Challenge, invite you to learn more at allinchallenge.orgWe hope that you will consider participating in this important endeavor and ask that you please share this information with the appropriate administrators on your campus. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Verdis Robinson or Zaneeta via email at zaneeta@civicnation.org or via phone at 202-930-5502.

#CLDE16 in Review

Our recent 2016 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE) Meeting in Indianapolis, Ind. brought together a collection of faculty, students, administrators, community partners and representatives from our national sponsor and partner organizations committed to advancing civic learning and democratic engagement through higher education.

Highlights of our time together:

By The Numbers
515 participants, representing 156 colleges and universities as well as 44 other organizations.

  • 66 AASCU/ADP Campuses
  • 43 TDC Campuses
  • 46 NASPA Lead Campuses
  • 113 Students
  • 11 Sponsors/Exhibitors

clde16wordcloudSocial Media Use and #CLDE16
Representatives (Nathan Carpenter & Steve Hunt) from Illinois State University’s Social Media Analytics Command Center (SMACC) analyzed the social conversation for the 2016 CLDE conference using social media tracking software (NUVI). Their analysis revealed the following insights:

  • There were 811 social mentions using the keywords @NASPAtweets, @TDCNational, @ADPaascu, #CLDE16, #CLDE, #FacesoofCLDE , #studentsofclde, #studentsofclde16, #facesofclde16, and #civedtalks between June 1st at 7 am (Central Daylight Time) and June 4th at 6 pm (Central Daylight Time).
  • 200 unique authors contributed to the overall conversation, producing an average of 8 posts per hour for the duration of the conference.
  • The #CLDE16 conversation was viral. Of the 811 mentions using the aforementioned keywords, 200 were from unique authors reaching a potential audience of 136,026. In addition, there were 406 re-shares spreading the mentions to an additional 289,191 people. Taken together, public mentions about #CLDE16 had the potential of being viewed by 425,217 people!
  • The peak of the social conversation occurred on June 4th at 8 am (117 mentions) and included the following keywords: “democracy,” “problems,” “campus,” “students,” and “too many colleges.”
  • Overall, the conversation was very positive about the conference. The top positive keywords in this conversation were “thanks,” “social justice,” “religious freedom,” “very interesting,” “glad,” “innovation,” “join,” and “inspiring.”

Sample Mentions

Most Active
The most active Twitter accounts using the #CLDE16 keywords were @ADPaascu (83 mentions), @JenDomagalG (36 mentions), @melanieps (21 mentions), @drgawilliamsjr (19 mentions), @btholloway (19 mentions), @DFTOME (17 mentions), @TDCNational (14 mentions), @seejenspeak (13 mentions), @skhunt2 (13 mentions), and @PriskilaGarcia (13 mentions).

Most Popular Mention
The most popular mention appeared on June 4th at 8:22 am, posted by @nelson_em96, and as of June 8th at 10:48 am, was retweeted 9 times:

Most Reach
The mention with the most reach (the account with the largest number of followers, 25,702) was posted by @NASPAtweets on June 1st at 8:45 am:

Most Active tweeter.jpg

Most Spread
The mention that generated the most spread ( how many additional social accounts re-tweeted or shared the mention) was posted on June 2nd at 2:30 pm by @AASCU. This account has 5,849 followers and the mention spread to 27,513 additional people:

most spread.jpg

Most Shared Positive Mention
On Thursday (June 2nd) at 2 pm, there was a spike of 50 positive mentions. The most shared positive mention was posted by @MrsOlbrys during this time period:

most shared.jpg

Highest Volume by State

Of the social media accounts that were geotagged or listed a location in their profile description, those originating in Washington, D.C. (160 mentions), Indiana (86 mentions) and Illinois (51 mentions) were the most active.

Top Hashtags
In addition to the official #clde16 conference hashtag, the next most frequently used hashtags were “#cldeindy” (81 mentions), “#facesofclde” (41 mentions), “#civedtalk” (17 mentions), “#sagrad” (14 mentions), “#education” (12 mentions), “#stocktonserves” (12 mentions), “#nslve” (11 mentions), “#civiclearning” (10 mentions), and “#ileadnevada” (10 mentions).

Top Keywords
The keywords that were most frequently used during the conference included “democracy” (51 mentions), “students” (38 mentions), “civic engagement” (24 mentions), “campus” (22 mentions), “religious freedom” (19 mentions), “political engagement” (18 mentions), “future” (18 mentions), “panel” (17 mentions), and “problems” (17 mentions).

Social Network Analysis
The following maps present a visual representation of the #CLDE16 Twitter conversation in terms of clusters (explores the degree to which nodes in a network group together) and degree centrality (the in-degree map represents the number of incoming links a node receives; the out-degree map represents the number of outgoing links a node sends). For an overview of social media analytics and social network analysis see Khan (2015).

clde16_clusters.jpg

clde16_indegree.jpg

clde16_outdegree.jpg

This report was prepared by the SMACC housed in the School of Communication at Illinois State University. For more information about the SMACC contact Nathan Carpenter, Assistant Director for Convergent Media (njcarpe@ilstu.edu) or Dr. Steve Hunt, Executive Director (skhunt2@ilstu.edu).

Reference
Kahn, G. F. (2015). Seven layers of social media analytics: Mining business insights from social media text, actions, networks, hyperlinks, apps, search engine, and location data. Retrieved from https://7layersanalytics.com/

Program Overview
The full program is available for download here (pdf).

Pre-Conference highlights:

  • The 2016 CLDE Meeting opened with six pre-conference sessions that introduced different– and equally important– elements of civic engagement and encouraged participants to begin the discussion and deliberation process. Participants were invited to take part in the Educational Testing Service (ETS)- sponsored CLDE Assessment Institute: Building Institutional Capacity for CLDE Assessment on Your Campus, aimed at helping campuses create a systematic approach to assessing student-campus-community relationships and fulfilling their civic mission. Participants could also attend the Electoral & Political Engagement Institute sponsored by icitizen, focused on introducing campuses to emerging research, tools, technology and practices for promoting nonpartisan student political engagement in this year’s presidential election and beyond.
  • Other pre-conferences included the ADP/TDC Economic Inequality Fellows Working Meeting; the Democratic Dialogue & Deliberation Institute: Introduction to Deliberative Democracy Theory & Practice; the ADP/TDC Economic Inequality Initiative Workshop; and the Student Pre-Conference Institute.
  • The Student Pre-Conference Institute was organized for students, by students. Led by the 2016 CLDE Meeting Intern Team (Monica Bustinza, junior, University of Miami (Fla.); Angelo Kapp, sophomore and vice president of Citizens In Action, Delta College (Mich.); Maryam Sarhan, junior and student trustee, Stockton University (N.J.); and Manisha Vepa, sophomore and Sondheim Public Affairs Scholar, University of Maryland Baltimore County), the session examined the vital role students play in shaping the landscape of higher education, and provided them with a space to harness their skills and passions about issues that matter most to them. In addition to introducing students to #CLDE16 and setting the conference agenda, the session included discussions about how to mobilize individuals on campus, create diverse partnerships, gain the support of faculty and administrators, and build support networks.

clde16 student precon.jpg

Opening Plenary & First Day highlights:

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CivEd Talk speakers (left to right): David Hoffman, Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, and Austin Belali [Image by Amy Rankin, Rack Focused Productions]
  • The inaugural CivEd talks kicked off Thursday afternoon’s opening plenary session. These three, short, dynamic and fast-paced presentations by members of the civic learning and democratic engagement community  inspired and challenged our collective imagination and thinking. The talks were given by: Austin Belali, director, Youth Engagement Fund, Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, director of CIRCLE, Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts University (Mass.), and David Hoffman, assistant director of student life for civic agency, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (Md.).
  • After our three speakers shared their powerful message we moved on to a networking reception. Guests had the opportunity to mingle with other civic-minded leaders while enjoying several campus and community projects at our poster session,  campus and friends showcase, and mentorship meetup.
  • Participants had the opportunity to watch a screening of Roadtrip Nation’s film “Ready to Rise” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zf0lHMn3BG0). “Ready to Rise” follows the respective journeys of Michael, Ryan, and Summer—three young people who are among the 5.6 million youth in America currently out of work, out of school, and struggling with challenges as extreme as homelessness. As they travel the country in Roadtrip Nation’s green RV, they meet people who have been in their shoes and show them it is not only possible to rise above adversity, but also to harness it for success.

Friday highlights:

Friday Plenary photo.jpg

  • Friday morning participants started their day with a presentation of the live television weekly TV program at WNIT-TV (South Bend): Politically Speaking, Indianapolis Edition: Religious Freedom vs. LGBT Rights in Indiana.  This session highlighted diverse perspectives on the issue of LGBT rights and religious freedom in Indiana. Attendees walked away with a better understanding of the debate, the host city, and ways to moderate difficult dialogues on controversial political issues. Host: Elizabeth A. Bennion, professor and acting chair, department of political science, Indiana University South Bend (Ind.) and host, Politically Speaking, WNIT Television Panelists: Jane Henegar, Executive Director, American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana; Chris Paulsen, Campaign Manager, Freedom Indiana; Peter Rusthoven, Partner, Barnes & Thornburg, LLP; and Timothy Wesco, Indiana House of Representative, District 21.
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Democracy Plaza at IUPUI [Image by Amy Rankin, Rack Focused Productions]
  • Friday evening participants were invited to take part in  a walking tour of Democracy Plaza (DP) at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). Established in 2004 by students and staff, Democracy Plaza at IUPUI serves as a place in the community to write, listen, watch or deliberate with peers on political ideas or issues. Many other campuses have adopted democracy walls as similar places for such dialogues. During this event, attendees interacted with the questions posed on the DP chalkboards. This tour included a history of the project, examples of current issues, and an overview of how IUPUI uses the space for events.

Saturday highlights:

  • In our closing plenary session on Saturday, participants listened to the campus stories of University of Houston-Downtown, Rollins College, University of South Carolina-Upstate, and Sinclair Community College and how they engage their campus communities in democracy.  This conversation was fueled by the data uncovered from one of the signature initiatives of the Institute for Democracy and Higher Education (IDHE) at the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts University (Mass.), the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE).

Saturday NSLVE plenary panelists.jpgThe Closing Plenary session featured campus stories from data collected by  NSLVE, one of the signature Initiatives of the Institute of Democracy for Higher Education at the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts University (Mass.).  Presenters included (back row, left to right)  Abe Goldberg, associate professor and co-director, office of service learning and community engagement, University of South Carolina Upstate; David Bodary, professor, communication, Sinclair Community College (Ohio); John Locke, student, University of Houston-Downtown (Tex.); Nancy L. Thomas, director, institute for democracy and higher education, Tufts University (Mass.); (front row, left to right) Micki Meyer, Lord Family Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, Rollins College (Fla.); and Ishara Casellas Connors, associate director, institute for democracy and higher education, Tufts University (Mass.).  [Image by Amy Rankin, Rack Focused Productions]
THANK YOU TO ALL OUR SPONSORS

The 2016 CLDE Meeting in Indianapolis, Ind. could not have been a success without the continued support from our sponsors. They have shown an unwavering commitment to securing an effective method of fostering democracy. Our sponsors’ contributions were  instrumental in creating meaningful dialogue that helped set the agenda for future goals, initiatives and partnerships. We would like to thank the following: ADP/TDC/NASPA have deep admiration and gratitude for each organization and the support they provided to the 2016 CLDE Meeting. We look forward to future collaborations.

clde16 sponsors image

CLDE 2017

We hope to see you in Baltimore, Maryland from June 7-10, 2017, for the next CLDE Meeting where we will continue our important work of preparing informed, engaged citizens for our democracy.

clde17.jpg

PowerPoints and other handouts from the meeting are available through the meeting’s mobile app.

Finally, to see more pictures from the meeting, visit the AD

RSVP Now for Summer TDC/ADP Engage the Election 2016 Webinars

We’re excited to announce our 5th and 6th ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 webinars powered by icitizen. These webinars are open to faculty, staff, students and friends.

 


 

Walk2Vote Logo

Webinar 5:  Student Empowerment through Civic Engagement

Thursday, July 28, 2016 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. Eastern

Please join us for a webinar on Student Empowerment through Civic Engagement on Thursday, July 28th, at 2 pm Eastern. During the program, John Locke, a former student body president at the University of Houston-Downtown (UHD) will introduce Walk 2 Vote, a student led, student executed, non-partisan political engagement program created by UHD students.  It has grown from a local/campus-based initiative to what is now a national movement. Learn how to host a #Walk2Vote campaign on your campus. Walk 2 Vote co-founder Locke will share the key components and philosophies that are important to successfully empower students to become politically engaged. He will also lead a discussion and share details of the Walk 2 Vote model including resource packets, contests, funding leads and marketing resources, opportunities to highlight your campus achievements and connections to organizations that will support your efforts.

Speaker:

John Locke, former Student Body President of the University of Houston-Downtown (Texas) and Co-Founder of Walk 2 Vote

RSVP TODAY!

 


 

turbovote-logo1Webinar 6: Voter Registration & Campus Technology: Engaging Student Voters by the Thousands
Wednesday, August 24, 2016 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EST

Offered in partnership with TurboVote, this webinar will explore the research and subsequent implementation of an innovative (yet, easy!) voter engagement strategy: integrating voter registration and resources into campus IT infrastructure. The TurboVote team and their campus partners will share success stories and their personal experiences with engaging the necessary stakeholders and turning web-based student portals and pass-throughs into “online voter registration tables.” Just in time for this fall’s election, we invite you to join us in raising the voter engagement bar and institutionalizing your registration efforts so voting can fit the way students live.

Speakers:

Matt Tharp and Emily Giffin, TurboVote Partner Support Leads will be joined by TurboVote Campus Partners

RSVP TODAY!

 

What Presidential Candidates Need

What Presidential Candidates Need

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Want to Meet President ? Here’s Your Chance

Want to Meet President ? Here’s Your Chance

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We Should be Proud of What We’ve Achieved

We Should be Proud of What We’ve Achieved

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How to Fix Our Economy

How to Fix Our Economy

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Health Care & Your Business

Health Care & Your Business

Sed ut perspiciatis, unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam eaque ipsa, quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt, explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem, quia voluptas sit, aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos, qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt, neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum, quia dolor sit, amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt, ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur?

Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit, qui in ea voluptate velit esse, quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum, qui dolorem eum fugiat, quo voluptas nulla pariatur? At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus, qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti, quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint, obcaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa, qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio.

Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio, cumque nihil impedit, quo minus id, quod maxime placeat, facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Temporibus autem quibusdam et aut officiis debitis aut rerum necessitatibus saepe eveniet, ut et voluptates repudiandae sint et molestiae non recusandae. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.