Engage the Election

RSVP Today for Free Engage the Election 2016 Webinar Tomorrow

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TOMORROW
Webinar #7
Graduating Students into Voters:  Overcoming the Psychological Barriers Faced by Student Voters and Improving Student Voting Rates Using Insights from the Behavioral Sciences
Wednesday, September 7, 2016 at 2 p.m. Eastern  RSVP here.

Graduating Student VotersHow do students decide to vote? And why do some students fail to cast a ballot even though they intend to on Election Day? More importantly, can we design programs to overcome barriers to student voting with simple, scalable innovations? In this webinar the behavioral design lab, ideas42, will review major findings from their new research on how insights from the behavioral sciences – including the fields of psychology and behavioral economics – can shed light on both the internal psychological forces (like a feeling that voting isn’t for me) and seemingly small external hassles (like not having a stamp to mail a voter registration form) that impact student voting. Participants will learn about the role of identity and social norms, the effect of being a first-time voter, and the impact of psychological distance on voting behavior. Participants will also walk away with more than 30 actionable tips and tricks that can be easily integrated to on-campus programs to improve their efficacy. Armed with these tips and tricks, we believe colleges and universities can more successfully execute on their mission to educate civically engaged youth. Read the research report here.

 

Engage the Election Webinar: Is Your Campus ALL IN?

As part of our ADP/TDC 2016 Engage the Election initiative, we’re partnering with the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge to bring you a webinar focused on this national, nonpartisan initiative focused on recognizing campuses that are increasing democratic engagement and student voting. Over 45 ADP and 12 TDC campuses are already signed up — this webinar is for campuses considering participating as well as campuses that are already ALL IN and want to know more about next steps. We hope you join us!


all-inIs your campus ALL IN? More than 130 college campuses across 33 states have committed to improving democratic engagement by joining the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge. The challenge is a national, nonpartisan initiative recognizing campuses for increasing democratic engagement and student voting. Your campus is invited to a special ADP/TDC Engage the Election webinar to learn more about this exciting new initiative.

The webinar will include:

  • The background of the ALL IN Challenge;
  • Why it is important for ADP campuses to join;
  • Who can join, and how to join;
  • The steps involved after committing;
  • Recognition and awards;
  • Q&A.

Date: Wed. September 21, 2016
Time: 2 p.m. ET

Register for the webinar HERE.

If you can’t join us for the ADP/TDC ALL IN Challenge webinar on September 21, then we invite you to participate in one of the other ALL IN Challenge webinars being offered this month, or contact Catherine Fish at cat@civicnation.org for additional information.

Campus Vote Project Webinars Announced

campus-vote-project

Our partners and friends at the Fair Elections Legal Network’s Campus Vote Project are holding a set of upcoming webinars to get up-to-date on state-specific election laws and the current best practices for voter engagement on campus. They’ll also share useful tools and how they can support your work.

The “Best Practices for Voter Engagement” webinars will cover:

  • Why Student Voting Matters,
  • Best Practices for Student Democratic Engagement,
  • Tools to Guide Your Work,
  • And State-based Election Law.

Florida Best Practices for Voter Engagement
When: August 25 at 1:30pm ET | RSVP HERE

Michigan Best Practices for Voter Engagement
When: August 30th at 1pm ET/12pm CT | RSVP HERE

Pennsylvania Best Practices for Voter Engagement
When: August 31st, at 12pm ET | RSVP HERE

Wisconsin Best Practices for Voter Engagement
When: August 31st at 2pm ET/1pm CT | RSVP HERE

Ohio Best Practices for Voter Engagement
When: September 13th at 12:30pm ET | RSVP HERE

Virginia Best Practices for Voter Engagement
When: September 15th at 12pm ET | RSVP HERE

Pew’s Voting Information Project (VIP)

Pew’s Voting Information Project (VIP): Delivering Non-Partisan Voting Information in 2016

619-07799305 © Masterfile Royalty-Free Model Release: Yes Property Release: No Students holding buttons at voter registration

What’s the first thing you do when you realize there’s an election coming?  If you’re like most people, you probably open a search engine and search “where’s my polling place?” or “what’s on my ballot?”  To make sure you can find this information and trust what you find, The Pew Charitable Trusts partnered with election officials and Google in 2008 to create the Voting Information Project (VIP) to give voters access to the information they need to cast a ballot on or before Election Day.

VIP has already provided election information for 44 elections, including 29 presidential preference primaries, and helped more than 3.4 million people find their polling place and ballot information via Facebook, presidential campaigns on both sides of the aisle, media websites, third party groups, and more, including our own website!  VIP provides free tools that anyone can use or promote to help their constituents find accurate, official voting information without requiring any personally identifiable information.  In addition, all of VIP’s information is published via the Google Civic Information API, which is open source and free for anyone to use

  • The Voting Information Tool is mobile-friendly, customizable tool that can be placed on your website. It provides official voting information, including polling locations, to anyone using just a residential address and is available in 16 languages.  You can try  the customizer to see how easy it is to use and to design the tool exactly how you want it to look, or the tool itself is open source and can be customized even further.
  • White-label iOS and Android mobile apps that can be customized, branded, and released by state and local governments. The apps are available in Spanish and English, and are both open source (iOS and Android).
  • short messaging service (SMS) tool provides voters with election information via text message in 10 languages. By texting “VOTE” or “VOTO” to GOVOTE (468-683), voters can find their polling place or dropbox location, contact information for a local election official, and a link to check voter registration status.  Although it isn’t customizable, anyone is welcome to promote it.
  • GettothePolls.com is a joint effort of Pew and the Internet Association.  The site allows voters to enter their addresses and find the location and hours of their polling place and ballot and candidate information.  Anyone can promote or link to this website.

If you or your organization has questions about VIP, please contact info@votinginfoproject.org and follow VIP on Twitter!

Engage the Election Summer 2016 Webinars: Recording & RSVP

Engage the Election Summer 2016 Webinars: Recording & RSVP

RECORDING AVAILABLE
Webinar #5 | Walk2Vote: Student Empowerment through Civic Engagement | Thursday, July 28, 2016
Walk2Vote (http://walk2vote.com/) is a student led, student executed, non-partisan political engagement program created by students from the University of Houston-Downtown (Texas). It has grown from a local/campus-based initiative to what is now a national movement. We discussed how to host a Walk 2 Vote campaign on your campus.

  • Speaker: John Locke, Walk2Vote Co-Founder and former Student Body President, University of Houston-Downtown
  • When: Thursday, July 28, 2016 from 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EST
  • Recording of webinar is available here (Time: 50:22)

 

RSVP NOW
Webinar #6 | Voter Registration & Campus Technology: Engaging Student Voters by the Thousands | Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Offered in partnership with TurboVote, this webinar will explore the research and subsequent implementation of an innovative (yet, easy!) voter engagement strategy: integrating voter registration and resources into campus IT infrastructure. The TurboVote team and their campus partners will share success stories and their personal experiences with engaging the necessary stakeholders and turning web-based student portals and pass-throughs into “online voter registration tables.” Just in time for this fall’s election, we invite you to join us in raising the voter engagement bar and institutionalizing your registration efforts so voting can fit the way students live.

  • Speakers:  Matt Tharp and Emily Giffin, TurboVote Partner Support Leads will be joined by TurboVote Campus Partners
  • When: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EST
  • RSVP here

Engage the Election 2016 Webinar: Engaging Student Voters in a Modern Democracy

Engage the Election 2016 Webinar: Engaging Student Voters in a Modern Democracy

Join the TurboVote team and campus partners for “Voter Registration & Campus Technology: Engaging Student Voters by the Thousands.” The webinar takes place on Wednesday, August 24 from 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EDT as a part of the ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 series. RSVP here.


turbovote-logo1Voting is the most basic form of civic participation we have in our democracy—one person, one vote. No matter political stance, line of work, or station in life, everyone can support the fundamental notion that conducting regular, nonpartisan elections furthers that idea. If a democracy that represents us all is the ultimate aim, a more inclusive democracy is the way to achieve it. Institutions of higher education have a valuable role to play in reaching that goal.

In fact, most colleges and universities have an obligation to promote civic participation by actively supporting their students in the voting process:

● A Dear Colleague letter from the Department of Education, released in summer 2013, reminds leaders of a provision included in section 487(a)(23) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 that specifically requires institutions to distribute voter registration forms to their students.

● The federal Higher Education Amendments of 1998 also requires colleges to make a “good faith effort” to distribute registration materials on their campuses.

For many of you, I suspect this information is not new nor are you interested in simply meeting minimum requirements. I imagine the question of “What could a ‘good faith effort’ look like?” is the more exciting – perhaps, daunting – unknown. While our shared goal of increasing youth civic participation brings us together, what brings us to the next level?

At Democracy Works, the home of TurboVote, we hope to answer that question. TurboVote is an application that makes voting easy. When you sign up, we keep track of your elections, local and national, and send you email/text reminders about important deadlines and dates. If you need to get registered, update your voter registration, or request an absentee ballot, we’ll get you all the forms and information you need, when you need them.

We connect with colleges and universities that use TurboVote everyday to talk strategy, new ideas, and, my favorite topic, how to improve our democracy. An equally valuable part of those conversations is acknowledging the difficulty of this work. From bureaucratic red tape to tabling fatigue, increasing voter registration on college campuses is difficult. Doing so in a way that has a dramatic, measurable impact is even harder.

To fulfill the spirit of the Higher Education Act, we need to embed voter resources into student life. We must institutionalize voter registration efforts on campus so democratic participation becomes second nature to all student voters.

In the first months of 2016, TurboVote partners across the country went to work conducting and aggregating research to identify best practices for integrating voter registration with campus web infrastructure. With funding support from the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Foundation, TurboVote conducted our IT Integration Study to answer two main questions: What is the IT landscape of communication and education technology on campus communities? How does that relate to campus voter registration and engagement?

Our lead research team out of the University of North Georgia constructed a survey to be administered at a variety of higher education institutions. Survey respondents came from six target groups: IT, academic affairs, student affairs, communications, faculty, and student organizations. 24 TurboVote partner campuses participated in the study in an effort to uncover both the opportunities and obstacles to IT integration.

We learned classroom integrations, links within student portals, and mass emails are the best opportunities for collaboration with IT departments to promote voter registration. Dedicated staff and students are key to starting the conversation on campus and engaging stakeholders who, we learned, are willing to give this a try. We were excited to share our findings and see what next steps campus partners might take.

Little did we know, TurboVote implementers across the country quickly traded in steps for serious leaps. At Lone Star College in Texas, Director of the Center for Civic Engagement Dr. Theis worked with IT staffers to include a call-to-action banner on their student portal to register through TurboVote. Their TurboVote site has since seen over 1,600 signups.

Beginning in fall 2016, all Harvard undergraduate students will have the opportunity to register to vote, request an absentee ballot, or sign up for election reminders as a part of their mandatory online “check in” process. Executive Director of the Harvard Institute of Politics (IOP) Cathy McLaughlin spearheaded the effort on campus enlisting the help of the Harvard Registrar’s Office and Oracle, provider of PeopleSoft Campus Solutions.

As the fall election draws near, many other campuses are pushing the ball forward and working to integrate voter registration into the portals and pass-throughs students use everyday. We’re excited to share their success stories and personal experiences with the hopes of empowering many more institutions to raise the bar for voter engagement. After all, if we can embed voter registration in this way, we can greatly strengthen our efforts in other valuable areas of this work: voter education, mobilization, and creating all-around engaged citizens. Then, we won’t just be meeting federal requirements; We’ll be helping to create a more inclusive democracy.

Join the TurboVote team and campus partners for Voter Registration & Campus Technology: Engaging Student Voters by the Thousands. The webinar takes place on Wednesday, August 24 from 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EDT as a part of the ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 series. RSVP here. We hope to see you there!

RSVP Now for Summer TDC/ADP Engage the Election 2016 Webinars

We’re excited to announce our 5th and 6th ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 webinars powered by icitizen. These webinars are open to faculty, staff, students and friends.

 


 

Walk2Vote Logo

Webinar 5:  Student Empowerment through Civic Engagement

Thursday, July 28, 2016 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. Eastern

Please join us for a webinar on Student Empowerment through Civic Engagement on Thursday, July 28th, at 2 pm Eastern. During the program, John Locke, a former student body president at the University of Houston-Downtown (UHD) will introduce Walk 2 Vote, a student led, student executed, non-partisan political engagement program created by UHD students.  It has grown from a local/campus-based initiative to what is now a national movement. Learn how to host a #Walk2Vote campaign on your campus. Walk 2 Vote co-founder Locke will share the key components and philosophies that are important to successfully empower students to become politically engaged. He will also lead a discussion and share details of the Walk 2 Vote model including resource packets, contests, funding leads and marketing resources, opportunities to highlight your campus achievements and connections to organizations that will support your efforts.

Speaker:

John Locke, former Student Body President of the University of Houston-Downtown (Texas) and Co-Founder of Walk 2 Vote

RSVP TODAY!

 


 

turbovote-logo1Webinar 6: Voter Registration & Campus Technology: Engaging Student Voters by the Thousands
Wednesday, August 24, 2016 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EST

Offered in partnership with TurboVote, this webinar will explore the research and subsequent implementation of an innovative (yet, easy!) voter engagement strategy: integrating voter registration and resources into campus IT infrastructure. The TurboVote team and their campus partners will share success stories and their personal experiences with engaging the necessary stakeholders and turning web-based student portals and pass-throughs into “online voter registration tables.” Just in time for this fall’s election, we invite you to join us in raising the voter engagement bar and institutionalizing your registration efforts so voting can fit the way students live.

Speakers:

Matt Tharp and Emily Giffin, TurboVote Partner Support Leads will be joined by TurboVote Campus Partners

RSVP TODAY!

 

Walk 2 Vote: Student Empowerment through Civic Engagement

In 1971, the UnitWalk2Vote Logoed States of America ratified the 26th Amendment to the Constitution granting the right to vote to 18-20-year-olds.

The 26th Amendment was the fastest to be ratified in U.S. history yet young people consistently comprise the smallest active voting bloc. At institutions such as the University of Houston-Downtown (Texas) engaging students in politics including voter registration and turnout can be especially difficult because although it is a four-year, public university it is considered a commuter institution, with more than 14,000 primarily undergraduate students and one of the most ethnically diverse institutions in the nation.  UHD is recognized as a federally qualified Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) and a Minority Serving Institution (MSI) which have historically low voting populations. Student leaders from UHD’s student government association have decided to take things into their own hands through a civic engagement initiative called “Walk 2 Vote.”

While there are hWalk2Vote 1undreds of organizations that focus on increasing youth voting turnout and engagement, Walk 2 Vote is one of the only programs created, organized and led by students. UHD students began the Walk to Vote initiative in 2012 and have continued it annually. In 2012, a record 70% of UHD students were registered to vote, and according to the latest results from the National Study of Learning, Voting and Engagement (NSLVE), 71.5% of those students actually voted and the overall voting rate of UHD students was 50%. Data from 2014, a non-presidential year, still demonstrates a robust registration rate of 65%. Data indicate a possible correlation between Walk 2 Vote and the significantly unexpectedly high voter registration and turnout at UHD.Walk2Vote 2

The Walk 2 Vote movement consists of three phases which are 1) foundation, 2) creation, and 3) celebration.

The main objective of the foundation phase is to set registration goals, organize a planning committee, create timelines and host voter deputy trainings (if required by state law).

The creationWalk2Vote 3.jpg phase consists of implementation of marketing campaigns, voter information sharing (e.g., public deliberations, debates, issue forum), and voter registration campaigns.

The celebration phase consists of the actual Walk 2 Vote event that features dancers, musical performances, and national keynote speakers. From there, we “walk 2 Vote” en masse to nearby poll during early voting. The actual Walk 2 Vote event can vary based on state and local voting laws, polling availability, etc.

In our recorded webinar we shared the key components and philosophies that are important to successfully empower students to become civically engaged. We also shared details of the Walk 2 Vote model including resource packets, contests, funding leads and marketing resources, opportunities to highlight your campuses achievements and connections to organizations that will support your efforts.
Walk2Vote 4

Voting is a right and a privilege that should be exercised to all eligible voters. It is through voting for knowledgeable and committed officials that we can all move the nation along the correct path in ensuring peace and equity for all its citizens, and interactions with the world. Many Americans, especially minority and youth, are ill-informed about issues and have little to no desire to vote. It is through gaining knowledge, deliberating upon the issues, and exercising the right to vote that people gain a voice in the trajectory of the country. Once people are engaged, they begin to take a deeper interest in the problems that plague the nation and consider solutions.

Thanks for joining us on Thursday July 28th  for this webinar featuring Walk2Vote Co-Founder John Locke, and follow Walk 2 Vote on social media:

https://www.facebook.com/Walk2Vote/https://www.instagram.com/walk2vote/https://twitter.com/walk2vote.

The Recorded Webinar can be accessed HERE.

RSVP Now: ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 Webinar on “Teenage Mutant Civic Hurdles: How Civic Tech Turns Students into Citizens” | Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

icitizenThis is the 4th of our ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 webinar series powered by icitizen. There will be six total webinars between now and November 2016 — all will be open to faculty, staff, students and friends.

ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 Webinar on “Teenage Mutant Civic Hurdles: How Civic Tech Turns Students into Citizens” | Wednesday, May 18th, 2016.

icitizen is a community where you connect with your elected officials to be heard on the civic issues you care about. With icitizen, you create change at the local, state and federal level.

Over the country, higher ed. institutions face the same problem—it is difficult to get students to become civically engaged, and even MORE difficult to sustain that engagement through graduation and beyond. Why is this? Today’s students aren’t apathetic—we are simply asking this 21st-century generation to participate through decades-old civic channels that are cumbersome, inefficient and unrepresentative.

In this webinar, Alex Schreiner and Mark Keida of civic tech start-up icitizen will explore the “rising tide” of powerful new engagement tools driven by technology and designed to solve this problem. These tools create a simple but powerful two-way feedback loop between students and the communities they care about, both on and off campus. Join us as we demonstrate how to create informed, engaged and empowered students—while measuring the impact higher education is having on their civic development.

  • Speakers:
    Mark Keida, Director of Polling from icitizen
    Alex Schreiner, Partnerships and Outreach Manager from icitizen
  • When:
    Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 2:30 p.m.-4 p.m. EST

RSVP here.

You can access a recording of the third Engage the Election 2016 Webinar on “Demystifying Youth-Why Some Young People Vote and Some Don’t” with CIRCLE, here: https://aascu.adobeconnect.com/p1krf5qvofe/