Engage the Election

Spotlight: PIEDMONT VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE: A MODEL FOR ELECTORAL ENGAGEMENT

Spotlight: PIEDMONT VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE: A MODEL FOR ELECTORAL ENGAGEMENT

Piedmont Virginia Community College: A Model for Electoral Engagement

PVCC 2016 Voter Registration Efforts

This past October, Piedmont Virginia Community College (PVCC) was presented with the “Best Action Plan” Champion Award along with a Silver Seal for campuses with 60-69% voter participation rates by the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge. The award were presented by TDC’s own Verdis Robinson at the awards ceremony which took place at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. PVCC’s electoral engagement action plans for both 2016 and 2017 also showcases their truly remarkable efforts of furthering voter engagement on campus through detailed research, study, and strong partnerships.

PVCC’s 2016 voter registration efforts resulted in 322 students registered through their partnership with TurboVote, an application that helps with everything from absentee ballot requests to keeping up with elections. Along with Virginia 21, an advocacy organization dedicated to young voters, and various other organizations, PVCC students from every discipline and clubs collaborated on projects to register and educate voters. With one such project called the “Non-Partisan Voter Guide,” journalism and government students worked together to come up with strategies to engage other students on why and how to vote.

PVCC’s efforts also featured a variety of campaigns to aid in voter awareness and education. These campaigns included a Constitution Day celebration on September 19th designed for providing students with entertaining constitutional education, and a “Free Speech Week” in October which featured a mock presidential debate planned by PVCC political science students. Virginia 21 and the PVCC Math Club also teamed up to host “Electoral College 101,” an interactive series of exercises centered around the primary function of and debated about the Electoral College.

PVCC’s student team at the 5th District Congressional Debate.

In PVCC’s 2016 report, they remarked on one of their largest barriers before the 2016 election was “..fully engaging the faculty and staff.”  However, after the 2016, it began to change.  Even with this lack of broad support initially, the electoral engagement efforts on campus were a resounding success.  PVCC had renewed its voter engagement plans for 2017 hoping to match the success of the previous year.

Connie Jorgensen PTK “Faculty of the Month” for September 2017

Lead by Dr. Connie Jorgensen, Assistant Professor of Political Science at PVCC, the voter engagement plan continued to encourage students to be politically engaged. Dr. Jorgensen is the TDC Campus Coordinator for PVCC also serving on TDC’s inaugural Campus Coordinator Advisory Council, and because of her leadership, she was named PVCC’s “Faculty of the Month” for September 2017.

Efforts this past month focused on the elections of the entire House of Delegates, a new Governor, and a new Attorney General, along with various other Virginia elections.  However, their efforts were informed by results from The Democracy Commitment’s  Civic Outcomes Study Survey along with the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSVLE) report. PVCC represents everything we here at TDC hope to enable in community colleges across the country for years to come.

PVCC’s Mock Presidential Debate “Free Speech Week”
#CLDE17 BALTIMORE IN REVIEW

#CLDE17 BALTIMORE IN REVIEW

#CLDE17 Baltimore in Review

Our recent 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE) Meeting in Baltimore, Md., brought together a great group of faculty, students, administrators, community partners and representatives from our national sponsor and partner organizations committed to advancing civic learning and democratic engagement through higher education.

Read on for highlights of our time together.

By The Numbers

608 participants (100 more than in 2016!) representing 181 colleges and universities as well as 52 other organizations.

  • 161 Four-year Colleges and Universities (103 public; 38 private)
  • 39 Community Colleges
  • 1 international university
  • 113 Students
  • 19 Sponsors/Exhibitors

Program Overview

The full program is available for download here (pdf).

Pre-Conference highlights:

  • The 2017 CLDE Meeting opened with nine pre-conference sessions that engaged participants in a variety of important civic learning and democratic engagement topics. Participants were invited to take part in one or both of a pair of popular Educational Testing Service (ETS)- sponsored Civic Engagement Assessment Pre-Conference Workshops focused on planning for institution-wide data collection and measuring civic outcomes during college, respectively.
  • Other pre-conference workshops included a full-day Charting a Course on the Pathway to Civic Engagement: An Inventory and Action Plan for Engaged Campuses workshop for campus teams as well as a set of half-day workshops including: Measures That Matter: Regarding Engaged Scholarship In Tenure and Promotion; Dialogue and Democratic Deliberation: Moderator Training; Educating for the Democracy We Want, Not the One We Have; and Integrating Civic Responsibility into the Curriculum.
  • The Student Pre-Conference Workshop was organized for students, by students. Led by the 2017 CLDE Student Intern Team (Amber Austin, sophomore, Tarrant County College (Texas.); Christina Melecio, sophomore, Winona State University (Minn.); and Tyler Ferrari, sophomore, Chapman University (Calif.)), the session introduced students to #CLDEStuds17 and provided a space to discuss issues focused on being an active participant in local and national communities, and introduced students tools to be effective activists in their communities.
  • In being mindful of the city that CLDE17 took place, there were three opportunities to engage with the Baltimore community. Two walking tours (Westside of Downtown Baltimore and Baltimore “Untour”) led by University of Maryland Baltimore County faculty members Nicole King, Ph.D., associate professor and chair of American Studies and Joby Taylor, director, Peaceworker Program at The Shriver Center. Towson University supported an exploratory session by Bus (Right to the City – Curtis Bay: Community Engagement through a Mobile App) led by Nicole Fabricant, associate professor; and Matthew Durington and Samuel Collins, professors, department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice.

Some of the more than 130 students that participated in #CLDE17

Opening Plenary & First Day highlights:

Visual Journalist Ellen Lovelidge’s depiction of the themes from Thursday’s Plenary

Participants had the opportunity to participate in two sponsored lunch sessions. The first, a 2017 Voter Engagement Symposium organized by our friends at TurboVote, provided an interactive symposium on what it takes to engaged student voters in not one, but all of their elections. The second lunch, sponsored by our friends at Roadtrip Nation, included a screening of their documentary film Beyond the Dream and included a panel discussion about undocumented immigrants and their higher education journeys.

  • UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski, III welcomed participants to Baltimore and reminded us that the most important office in our democracy is that of citizen. Three CivEd talks then kicked off Thursday afternoon’s opening plenary session. These three, short, dynamic and fast-paced presentations by members of the civic learning and democratic engagement community  inspired and challenged our collective imagination and thinking. The talks were given by: Jane Coaston, political reporter, MTV News, Martín Carcasson, founder and director, Center for Public Deliberation, Colorado State University, and Eric Liu, CEO, Citizen University. Attendees also participated in a Sworn Again citizen ceremony lead by Eric Liu.
  • Participants were each given a copy of Eric Liu’s new 2017 book You’re More Powerful Than You Think: A Citizen’s Guide to Making Change Happen and had the opportunity to have Eric sign their books during our networking reception. They were also able to learn from poster presenters and the campus showcase tables.

Friday highlights:

More than 50 participants volunteered as table moderators during Friday’s plenary

  • Friday morning participants started their day with a Dialogue and Deliberation Forum: Safety and Justice: How Should Communities Reduce Violence? This session — offered in conjunction with our friends at the National Issues Forums Institute — explored the increasing violence in U.S. communities, law enforcement, and race and how this violence undermines national ideals of safety and justice for all citizens. Attendees used briefing materials prepared by the Kettering Foundation to participate in deliberations promoted by the National Issues Forums Institute and spent time considering the difficult choices the nation must face in order to make progress.  Over 50 CLDE attendees graciously volunteered to serve as table moderators to over 400 participants.  The forum concluded with a panel discussing the applications of these forums in classrooms, campuses, and communities, and discussed why this civic skill is so critical now more than ever before.  Panelists included:  Adam Thompson, junior, Winona State University (Minn.); John Dedrick, Vice-President, Kettering Foundation; Emily Bowling, Assistant Director of Student Leadership & Involvement for Civic Engagement and Sustainability, Oregon State University; and John J. Theis, Executive Director, Center for Civic Engagement, Lone Star College (Texas). Participants left the forum with a hands-on, interactive experience in deliberative democracy that can be applied across higher education.

Saturday highlights:

Our final plenary session on Saturday, June 10th, The Theory of Our Work – Today and Tomorrow: What’s Next?, focused on our emergent theory of change. Participants engaged in conversations about the emerging theory of change for our conference and work, based on elements from A Crucible Moment and on our four guiding questions. The guiding questions are:

  1. Vision question: What are the key features of a thriving democracy we aspire to enact and support through our work?
  2. Learning Outcomes question: What knowledge, skills, and dispositions do people need in order to help create and contribute to a thriving democracy?
  3. Pedagogy question: How can we best foster the acquisition and development of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for a thriving democracy?
  4. Strategy question: How can we build the institutional culture, infrastructure, and relationships needed to support learning that enables a thriving democracy?

Responses to each were given by: Manisha Vepa, undergraduate student, and David Hoffman, assistant director, student life, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC); Sandy Rodriguez, director, ASUN Center for Student Engagement, University of Nevada, Reno; and Helen-Margaret Nasser, associate director, honors program, CUNY Kingsborough Community College (NY).

We considered what a thriving democracy looks like and higher education’s role in cultivating this democracy. View the full theory of change here.

CLDE Theory of Change | 4 Questions | Front of Placemat

CLDE Theory of Change | Back of Placemat

THANK YOU TO ALL OUR SPONSORS

The 2017 CLDE Meeting in Baltimore, MD. could not have been a success without the continued support from our sponsors. They have shown an unwavering commitment to securing an effective method of fostering democracy. Our sponsors’ contributions were  instrumental in creating meaningful dialogue that helped set the agenda for future goals, initiatives and partnerships. We would like to thank the following:

ADP, TDC, and NASPA have deep admiration and gratitude for each organization and the support they provided to the 2017 CLDE Meeting. We look forward to future collaborations.

CLDE 2018

We hope to see you in Anaheim, California, from June 6-9, 2018, for the next CLDE Meeting where we will continue our important work of preparing informed, engaged citizens for our democracy.

PowerPoints and other handouts from the meeting are available through the meeting’s mobile app. Please email sreynolds@naspa.org with any additional materials you’d like uploaded into the app.

Finally, to see more pictures from the meeting, visit the ADP Facebook Page (CLDE17 album); please send any photos you took to adp@aascu.org so that we can upload them to Facebook/Twitter/Instagram.

TDC Post-Election Series: “Election Reflections”

This blog was originally posted by NASPA Lead Initiative on November 10, 2016. Reposted by author permission.

Author:  Nancy Thomas, Director, Institute for Democracy & Higher Education, Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life.


As the director of a research institute studying higher education’s role in democracy, I have been inundated on November 9 with emails, texts, and calls. Donald Trumps’ election as the 45th President of the United States shocked people on college campuses who are worried about his messages of exclusion, hate, and fear, his disregard for facts and truth, and an anti-intellectualism that may characterize his leadership and  “base.” As I have written before, his messages are antithetical to goals of truth, equal opportunity, and inclusion central to higher education’s mission. We hope that colleges and universities will seize this moment in the nation’s history to reflect on their role in strengthening American democracy. That reflection would include honest introspection and an examination of political learning, discourse, and action during the election, as well as a look at the underlying campus climate for democratic learning. We’ll be posting some questions that campuses can use as the basis for this reflective exercise.

I envision three kinds of immediate responses on college and university campuses. One would be programming to address concerns of students, those who supported Hillary Clinton and feel like their work was for naught and those who feel denigrated and at risk based on their gender, race/ethnicity, immigrant status, physical abilities, and more. The second could be conversations about what this means for students personally in terms of their loans, the cost of college, their legal status in this country, some of which is already covered in Inside Higher Ed. A third might be a message of opportunity from institutional leaders – including the notion that President-Elect Trump represents everyone, not just his supporters, and that what we have witnessed is democracy in action.

These are appropriate immediate responses, but I would like to propose something more far-reaching and aligned with higher education’s mission, something educational.  

College and university faculty and leaders should view this election as a teachable moment and an opportunity to reflect on how well they fulfilled their roles as educators of citizens in a just democracy. Here are some questions I hope faculty and administrators will ask themselves – and ask students about:

  • To what extent was this election used to advance political discourse, agency, and equity campus-wide? Did faculty across disciplines, not just in fields like political science, discuss policy issues in the classroom?
  • Did students across disciplines grapple with underlying problems of hate, discrimination, and marginalization based on social identity, political ideology, or lived experiences?
  • To what extent did the institution involve the local community in understanding election issues, facts, and policy implications? Was the community invited to election activities? Did faculty and students go out into the community for political conversations?
  • How did students learn about and gauge multiple viewpoints around the country, particularly the challenges of non-college youth or people from different communities? Was empathy an explicit learning goal for students?
  • Did students understand the government’s system of checks and balances, the difference between the legislative, executive, and judicial branches and what was at stake beyond the presidency? How well does the political process actually work, and how can it be improved?
  • What was the role of basic fact-checking in this election? How did students, faculty, and staff come to informed voting choices?
  • What is the institution’s overall campus climate for political learning and engagement? How diverse yet cohesive are your students, faculty, and staff? How do students practice political agency on campus? How did you balance free expression, inclusion, and respect?

Colleges and universities can take this opportunity to take stock of how well they used this election to educate students for their role as citizens in a democracy, and how they worked with the local community to gain understanding of election choices. To the extent that the answers to these questions raise doubts about the campus climate for or commitment to student political learning and engagement, this election presents an opportunity for change. Political learning and engagement in democracy begins anew today, not during the next election season. Like all elections, this one should be a wake-up call.


Nancy Thomas directs the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education and the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE) at Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life NSLVE is both a service to colleges and universities – providing more than 900 institutions nationally with tailored reports containing their student s’ voter registration and voting rates – and a database of 8.5 million student records, which is used to study college student political learning and engagement in democracy.  She holds a doctorate from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a JD from Case Western Reserve University. (NSLVE is a partner of TDC) You can follow along with our work on Twitter @TuftsIDHE.


Opinions expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of TDC. If you agree or disagree with the content of this post, we encourage you to dialogue in the comment section below. Thank you.

TDC Electoral Engagement Resource Pages Now Updated

The Democracy Commitment (TDC) has desired to become a national clearinghouse of resources, publications, program designs, curricula, and project development strategies for community colleges.  In an effort to make resources more accessible and comprehensive, and especially in preparation for the upcoming election, TDC has updated the resource pages on its website- www.thedemocracycommitment.org.  All member institutions have access to these materials and ideas which extend beyond volunteerism embracing civic work broadly to include the democratic practice. Please visit our newly designed resource pages for information, links, tools, and guides for voter registration and electoral engagement.  Also, feel free to share suggestions for more resources.

The following is a summary of what you will find on the TDC website.  Please click on the link for more information:


Voter Registration Tool and Resources

Student voters are essential to our democracy.  As elected officials are increasingly making decisions on topics like student debt, funding for higher education, and the economy that can have direct effect on student success, students have the power to make a difference.  An important way to achieve this is to make their voices heard at the polls on Election Day.  The first step is voter registration.  The resources below provide information about the many voter registration tools at your disposable to make the voting process as easy and accessible as possible on your campus and for our students.  We also would like to introduce a TDC Register to Vote tool powered by Rock the Vote that you can use at your convenience located on our website.

TDC Best Practice User Guides for Voter Registration:

Online Tools for Voter Registration:

  • Canivote.org
  • TheFederal Voting Assistance Program
  • Rock the Vote
  • TurboVote
  • Vote.org
  • Vote411.org
  • Voto Latino’s- VoterPal

Click Here for More Information


Electoral Engagement Resources

Electoral education and engagement are also essential to our democracy, and student engagement in the election on our member campuses is a priority. Civic responsibility and duty means more than just showing up to cast a ballot on election day— it means engaging in the community and nation, and choosing candidates who share a vision for what matters.  It starts with registering students to vote, but it must continue with educating students on who and what’s on the ballot, so that when election day comes, they are ready to vote informed and empowered.  Most of the resources here are for voter information and ballot/candidate information that can inform and educate student voters.  We have compile documents and written Best Practice Guides to assist our members in educating and engaging community college students in the electoral process.

Engage the Election Logo

ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 Webinar Series powered by icitizen

  • Webinar #1 | Becoming a Voter-Friendly Campus
  • Webinar #2 | National Study of Learning, Voting & Engagement (NSLVE)
  • Webinar #3 | “Demystifying Youth Voting – Why Some Young People Vote and Some Don’t”
  • Webinar #4 | “Teenage Mutant Civic Hurdles: How Civic Tech Turns Students into Citizens”
  • Webinar #5 | Walk2Vote: Student Empowerment through Civic Engagement
  • Webinar #6 | Voter Registration & Campus Technology: Engaging Student Voters by the Thousands
  • Webinar #7 | Graduating Students into Voters: Overcoming the Psychological Barriers Faced by Student Voters and Improving Student Voting Rates Using Insights from the Behavioral Sciences
  • Webinar #8 | Text, Talk, Vote!
  • Webinar #9 | Is your campus ALL IN? Join the Challenge to Increase Democratic Engagement

Click Here for the Webinar Information and Recordings

TDC Best Practice Guides for Electoral Campus Engagement:

Voting Information Resources- “How Do I Vote?” “Where Do I Vote?”

  • Voter Information Project
  • Verified Voting
  • Vote411.org

Ballot/Candidate Information Resources- “Who/What’s on the Ballot?”

  • Ballot Ready
  • icitizen
  • NBCUVoterEducation.com

Electoral Information Resources- “How Does it Work?”

  • 270towin.com
  • Countable: Contact Congress and Vote on Bills.
  • Electionary
  • Vote Smart

Click Here for More Information


Partner and Friends Electoral Engagement Resources

We have compiled a list of Partner and Friends resources vetted by TDC which offering valuable national connections with national organizations with the goal of preparing future Americans to be informed, active, and mobilized citizens in their communities, states, and the nation.

 

ceep

Campus Election Engagement Project (CEEP) http://www.campuselect.org

 

 

campus-vote-project

Campus Vote Project http://campusvoteproject.org

 

FELN Logo

Fair Elections Legal Network (FELN) http://fairelectionsnetwork.com

 

vip-logo

Voting Information Project (VIP)- https://www.votinginfoproject.org

Click Here for More Information

Happy National Voter Registration Day!! From TDC

National Voter Registration Day, September 27, 2016

Happy National Voter Registration Day!!

The Democracy Commitment celebrates National Voter Registration Day as a Special Day of Action.  According to the coalition, in 2008, 6 million Americans didn’t vote because they missed a registration deadline or didn’t know how to register.   In 2016, the movement wants to make sure no one is left out.  On September 27, 2016, volunteers, celebrities, and organizations from all over the country will “hit the streets” for National Voter Registration Day (NVRD).  This single day of coordinated field, technology and media efforts will create pervasive awareness of voter registration opportunities–allowing us to reach tens of thousands of voters who we could not reach otherwise.  National Voter Registration Day is an opportunity to put our differences aside and celebrate the rights that unite us as Americans; democracy.

TDC encourages all member institutions to join the national network of a thousand organizations operating on the ground and through social media to register voters on their campuses and communities while also receiving pledges to vote from those already registered.

Register to Vote using the TDC Register to Vote Tool powered by Rock the Vote: https://register2.rockthevote.com/?partner=35891.  Already registered? Share it with someone who is not!

TDC member institutions that have schedule events include:

  • Allegany College Of Maryland
  • Community College Of Allegheny
  • Cuyahoga Community College
  • Delta College
  • Glendale Community College
  • Lone Star College
  • Los Angeles Harbor College
  • Mesa Community College
  • Miami Dade College
  • Middlesex Community College
  • Monroe Community College
  • Northampton Community College
  • Palo Alto College
  • Paradise Valley Community College
  • Piedmont Virginia Community College
  • Santa Fe College
  • South Mountain Community College
  • Tarrant County College

Congratulations on taking action!  Be sure to share you results with us!

Here’s how other campuses can also take action:

  • Have students Check their registration status to see if they need to register or update their registration.
  • Have students remind friends, family, coworkers, and neighbors to register to vote today by sending them an email telling them to register, check their registration, or update their registration if they need to.

Additionally, our friends at the Fair Elections Legal Network and Campus Vote Project have a variety of resources to help answer any questions you may have about registering and voting:

And be sure to join us on Tuesday, October 4th as we Tweet-up the Vice Presidential Debate using#iDebate16.  For further information on NVRD, visit their website: http://nationalvoterregistrationday.org

#iDebate16 Debate Watch Tweet-Up TONIGHT!!!

Engage the Election 2016 Debate Tweet-Ups

Consider having your students tweet ideas, questions, analysis, and observations about the first 2016 Presidential Debates as part of a political science, communications, or other academic course or as part of a watch event planned on campus. Or join the conversation on your own! Whether you’re hosting a campus Debate Watch Event or will be tuning into the debates on your own, we hope you’ll join us on Twitter using the #iDebate16 hashtag for a robust conversation and analysis of the debates, the candidates and the issues confronting our democracy.

If you’re hosting debate watch events and/or plan to participate in these tweet-ups, please register your participation in this Google Form.

icitizen is a civic technology company that will be conducting polling throughout the Presidential debates, as well as the election itself. We want all voice to be heard! Go to www.icitizen.com, and/or download the icitizen app on your smartphone or tablet. You’ll be able to vote in polls and see how your answers stack up against other students nationwide.

Illinois State University’s Social Media Analytics Command Center (SMACC) will track and provide analysis of our #iDebate16 tweet-ups.

As ADP and TDC are non-partisan and interested in preparing the next generation of informed, engaged citizens, we hope many of you will join us and encourage your students to do so as well—we want to encourage more students to engage in the electoral process and are not looking for a partisan battle, but for a supportive, interesting, and analytical conversation that encourages civic and political engagement.

Join Us!

  • What:  ADP/TDC 2016 Presidential Debate Watch Tweet-Ups
  • When: Monday, 9/26 Presidential Debate 1 from Hofstra University in NYC from 9 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Eastern (our programming from 8:30 to 11
  • How: On Twitter using the hashtag #iDebate16; it only takes a few minutes for most students to learn to use Twitter, and they can create an account at https://twitter.com
  • Follow: @ADPaascu, @TDCnational, @icitizen and @ISUSOC_SMACC

Be sure to check out our all-new 2016-debate-watch-tweet-up-guide!

Debate Watch Event Resources:

As part of our ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 initiative powered by icitizen, we will be hosting a series of Presidential Debate Watch Tweet-ups. More info.

TDC Adopts National Voter Registration Day as a Special Day of Action

National Voter Registration Day, September 27, 2016

The Democracy Commitment adopts National Voter Registration Day as a Special Day of Action.  According to the coalition, in 2008, 6 million Americans didn’t vote because they missed a registration deadline or didn’t know how to register.   In 2016, the movement wants to make sure no one is left out.  On September 27, 2016, volunteers, celebrities, and organizations from all over the country will “hit the streets” for National Voter Registration Day (NVRD).  This single day of coordinated field, technology and media efforts will create pervasive awareness of voter registration opportunities–allowing us to reach tens of thousands of voters who we could not reach otherwise.  National Voter Registration Day is an opportunity to put our differences aside and celebrate the rights that unite us as Americans; democracy.

TDC encourages all member institutions to join the national network of a thousand organizations operating on the ground and through social media to register voters on their campuses and communities while also receiving pledges to vote from those already registered.

Register to Vote using the TDC Register to Vote Tool powered by Rock the Vote: https://register2.rockthevote.com/?partner=35891.  Already registered? Share it with someone who is not!

TDC member institutions who have schedule events include:

  • Allegany College Of Maryland
  • Community College Of Allegheny
  • Cuyahoga Community College
  • Delta College
  • Glendale Community College
  • Lone Star College
  • Los Angeles Harbor College
  • Miami Dade College
  • Middlesex Community College
  • Northampton Community College
  • Palo Alto College
  • Paradise Valley Community College
  • Piedmont Virginia Community College
  • Santa Fe College
  • South Mountain Community College
  • Tarrant County College

Join them and take action!  Click HERE to sign-up.

For further information, visit their website: http://nationalvoterregistrationday.org

ADP/TDC Presidential Debate Watch Tweet-Up Series Announced

engageelection_fbcover

Join Us! Engage the Election 2016 Debate Watch #iDebate16 Tweet-Ups

As part of our ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 initiative powered by icitizen, we will be hosting a series of Presidential Debate Watch Tweet-ups.

Planning a debate watch event on campus? Consider tweeting your ideas, questions, analysis and observations about the 2016 Presidential and Vice Presidential Debates as part of a political science, communications or other academic course or as part of a watch event planned on campus. Or join the conversation on your own! Whether you’re hosting a campus or organizational debate watch event or will be tuning into the debates on your own, we hope you’ll join us on Twitter using the #iDebate16 hashtag for a robust conversation and analysis of the debates, the candidates and the issues confronting our democracy.

If you’re hosting a debate watch event and/or plan to participate in these tweet-ups, please register your participation in this Google Form.

As ADP and TDC are non-partisan and interested in preparing the next generation of informed, engaged citizens, we hope many of you will join us and encourage your students to do so as well—we want to encourage more students to engage in the electoral process and are not looking for a partisan battle, but for a supportive, interesting, and analytical conversation that encourages civic and political engagement.

Join Us!

  • What:  ADP/TDC 2016 Presidential Debate Watch Tweet-Ups
  • When:
    • Monday, 9/26:  Presidential Debate 1 from Hofstra University in NYC from 9 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Eastern (our programming from 8:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern)
    • Tuesday, 10/4: Vice Presidential Debate at Longwood University in Virginia 9 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Eastern (our programming from 8:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern)
    • Sunday, 10/9: Presidential Town Hall Meeting (time not yet announced)
    • Wednesday, 10/19:  Presidential Debate 2 from UNLV from 9 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Eastern (our programming from 8:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern)
  • How: On Twitter using the hashtag #iDebate16; it only takes a few minutes for most students to learn to use Twitter, and they can create an account at https://twitter.com
  • Follow: @ADPaascu@TDCnational@icitizen and @ISUSOC_SMACC

Tweet-Up Guide:  Be sure to check out our all-new 2016 ADP/TDC Debate Watch Tweet-Up Guide!

Other Debate Watch Event Resources:

We’re thrilled to partner with icitizen, a civic technology company that will be conducting polling throughout the Presidential debates, as well as the election itself. They want to hear your voice! Go to www.icitizen.com, and/or download the icitizen app on your smartphone or tablet. You’ll be able to vote in polls and see how your answers stack up against others nationwide. In addition, Illinois State University’s Social Media Analytics Command Center (SMACC) will track and provide analysis of our #iDebate16 tweet-ups

Engage the Election Webinar #9- ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge

Engage the Election 2016 Webinar #9:
Is your campus ALL IN? Join the Challenge to Increase Democratic Engagement

Wednesday, September 21, 2016 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EST
RSVP here.

all inIs your campus ALL IN? More than 130 college campuses across 33 states (including 45 ADP campuses & 12 TDC campuses) have committed to improving democratic engagement by joining the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge.

The challenge is a national, nonpartisan initiative recognizing campuses for increasing democratic engagement and student voting. Your campus is invited to a special Engage the Election 2016 webinar to learn more about this exciting new initiative. During the webinar, participants will: learn about the background of the ALL IN Challenge and why it is important for campuses to join; understand who can join, and how to join; and be introduced to the steps involved after committing as well as the opportunity for recognition and awards. RSVP TODAY for the Webinar Tomorrow!!

 

RSVP Today for the Engage the Election Webinars #8 and 9

Engage_the_Election_logo

Webinar #8
Text, Talk, Vote!
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 | 2 p.m. EST
Register here.

Text Talk Vote logo.pngText, Talk, Vote
 uses a text-based platform to facilitate in-person conversations about voting with a small group of young people (3-4 per group). The group receives and discusses prompts delivered by text, interacting with each other and moving through the program at their own pace. The free program creates meaningful conversations about politics and policy, elevates the voices of younger voters, and increases civic participation and turnout. After using the platform, participants identifying as “definitely going to vote” rises by 21%. Participants not only enjoy the program and have a great time, but also feel more informed and report learning something new from their peers. Try Text, Talk, Vote right now by texting in “Vote” to 42016. You can use this free, open platform whenever you want.


Webinar #9
Is your campus ALL IN? Join the Challenge to Increase Democratic Engagement
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. EST
RSVP here.

all inIs your campus ALL IN? More than 130 college campuses across 33 states (including 45 ADP campuses & 12 TDC campuses) have committed to improving democratic engagement by joining the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge. The challenge is a national, nonpartisan initiative recognizing campuses for increasing democratic engagement and student voting. Your campus is invited to a special ADP webinar to learn more about this exciting new initiative. During the webinar, participants will: learn about the background of the ALL IN Challenge and why it is important for campuses to join; understand who can join, and how to join; and be introduced to the steps involved after committing as well as the opportunity for recognition and awards.