Author page: TDC National Office

Hotel Deadline is Today 5/16 for #CLDE17

Hotel Deadline is Today 5/16 for #CLDE17

2017 Civic Leadership and Democratic Engagement Meeting | June 7-10 | Baltimore, MD

The deadline to book hotel rooms for the 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE17) meeting is Tuesday, May 16. Book now to guarantee our low rates!

If you have already booked rooms at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, thank you for supporting #CLDE17 with your accommodations. By filling the hotel block, we can provide meeting space and conference amenities without needing to increase the meeting rate, and fulfilling that obligation helps us offset some of the costs of organizing and holding this annual meeting. Furthermore, filling our room block consistently helps us secure favorable contracts for future meetings.

Click HERE to book your room(s). 

#CLDE17 Quick Links

Meeting Info
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#CLDE17: RSVP Now for TurboVote’s Voter Engagement Symposium & Lunch

#CLDE17: RSVP Now for TurboVote’s Voter Engagement Symposium & Lunch

Thursday, June 8th
11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m.

2017 Voter Engagement Symposium: Engaging Locally & Strategizing Digitally

Lunch provided; RSVP now via registration as event is capped at 70 participants

Please join TurboVote, our partner colleges and universities, and other nonprofit organizations for an interactive symposium on what it takes to engage student voters in not one, but all of their elections. Together, we will learn about specific nonpartisan tactics for institutionalizing voter registration on campus and making voting a default student experience. While a presidential election year provides additional resources for and an increased focus on voting, we’ll discuss action items that can be implemented in a non-presidential year to create a more democratically engaged campus and community. All interested parties are welcome to attend. Lunch will be provided, as saving democracy tends to work up quite the appetite!

Lunch will be provided, as saving democracy tends to work up quite the appetite! RSVP today as event is capped at 70 participants. Space is filling fast!

Already registered for the 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Meeting? Email durhamf@aascu.org to add this free lunch session! Not registered yet? Be sure to select the option when you register! Register HERE.

Q & A with the #CLDE17 Student Interns

Q & A with the #CLDE17 Student Interns

By Amber Austin, Christina Melecio and Tyler Ferrari, #CLDE17 Student Interns

Hello readers! We are the 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Meeting student interns, and we are happy to be working with the planning committee this year to create the wonderful #CLDE17 conference. In addition to helping with the ideas for the conference as a whole, we are also tasked with planning a student symposium where we will be discussing important and relevant topics with the student attendees. Before this happens, however, we would like all attendees to get to know us better, so we created a Q&A between the three of us where you get to learn more about our views on civic and community engagement. We hope you enjoy it!

Amber Austin, Sophomore, Tarrant County College (Texas)
Christina Melecio, Sophomore, Winona State University (Minn.)
Tyler Ferrari, Sophomore, Chapman University (Calif.)


2017.04.28 CLDE Student Intern Blog Photo 2

Amber Austin

What do you do for campus involvement?

Amber: For campus involvement, I am a member of eight clubs, for which I am the president of two and an officer in several others.

Tyler: I plan and moderate deliberative dialogues on important issues ranging from homelessness to gun control.

Christina: I am fairly involved with my campus. I hold a position in Student Senate where I sit on several committees that make decisions that affect the university. I am also the president of Political Science Association, and the treasurer of College Democrats.

How did you get involved in TDC/ADP/NASPA?

Amber: I became involved in The Democracy Commitment because of two of my professors during my freshman year. My professors asked me to help them with a “Know Your Candidate” project and it blossomed from there.

Tyler: My supervisor had me apply for this position, and many of our programs are modeled after NASPA programs!

Christina: One of my friends was the intern for ADP on my campus and often needed volunteers at events he organized. I was able to volunteer and then got to know the professor who runs ADP on my campus.

What are you looking forward to most at this year’s conference?

Amber: At this year’s CLDE conference, I am looking forward to our student symposium the most. That is our chance, as student interns, to hear the other students’ voices on universal issues, as well as to get to know the students that are attending the conference.

Tyler: Meeting other students and gaining their knowledge on civic engagement along with their experience.

Christina: I am so excited to get a diverse perspective from students that attend the conference. I am also excited for the moderating that will take place.

2017.04.28 CLDE Student Intern Blog Photo 4

Christina Melecio

What has been your most enjoyable moment in the planning process for the 2017 CLDE conference?

Amber: The most enjoyable moments I have had during the planning process of this year’s conference are the conference calls with the other two interns. Being an intern for this event is very enjoyable especially since I can share it with two other people.

Tyler: Working with the rest of the committee, especially my fellow interns! They have been great and easy to work with.

Christina: Meeting other people who have a passion who being involved, and getting others involved. I have especially enjoyed the time with the other two interns, and the topics we have been able to discuss.

In your opinion, what is the most important aspect of civic engagement involvement? What is your experience in this type of engagement?

Amber: I believe the most important aspect of civic engagement involvement is the impact working in the community makes. Working to make a difference in civic life is important in itself, but the impact is what counts. My experience includes, know your candidate campaigns, student voter registration programs, and campus/community trash clean-ups.

Tyler: Getting people interested in local issues is the most important. I’ve worked on campaigns before and I really enjoyed telling people about the issues our campaign focuses on. It was always rewarding to have people involved in the community.

Christina: I think that the most important aspect of civic engagement has to deal with education. Educating people on the issues, so they do not blindly support one way or the other without much thought or background knowledge.

What is your favorite thing about engaging in your community politically, socially, etc?

Amber: My favorite thing about engaging in my community is meeting and communicating with new people to understand their situations, as well as, their thought process regarding social and political issues.

Tyler: Meeting the different people and talking about their experiences. Especially in a state like California, there are so many diverse viewpoints and learning about as many as I can is very rewarding and helps me shape my view of the world.

Christina: My favorite part of becoming engaged in my community, whichever way, is the people who I connect with. Each person has a different perspective, or background, and being able to hear and understand them is what makes me excited.

What is one thing you wish you could change about our political climate?

Amber: Due to the previous presidential election, our political climate is scattered. Many are angry and many have given up. If I could change anything with the political climate, I would bring the divided back together, so we can make a change as a unit.

Tyler: Discourse must me more civil, without the civility that politics normally provides, nothing useful and good for society will get accomplished. Politics has centered too much around tribalism and I think breaking that mindset is something that is important to do.

Christina: I think currently the political climate could use a few adjustments, mostly having to deal with the divided nature of society.

2017.04.28 CLDE Student Intern Blog Photo 5

Tyler Ferrari

Tell us about an experience of when you tried to engage students?

Amber: I tried to engage students in the biggest way during our last presidential election. My main focus was getting students to care about their community and realize that their vote does matter.

Tyler: Registering people to vote before the election. We worked at our school’s freshman orientation and we were able to register so many new voters!

Christina: I have done different democratic deliberations, and it is a challenge in order to get students engaged in the conversation. There are many students who don’t want to participate in the conversation, and it is a struggle to have them bring their opinions to the deliberation. More often than not, putting effort into someone they will return it.

How did you become an engaged student?

Amber: I became an engaged student because of The Democracy Commitment. Before I joined TDC, I would go to class and go straight home. They helped me realize how much of a difference one person can make in a community.

Tyler: My mom was always politically engaged and really got me involved in local politics.

Christina: I have always naturally been someone who enjoys being active in clubs, and the next step was to become engaged in other activities. Ranging from student government, or local politics, I have always wanted to participate in the life that is happening around me.

What do you think the number one issue is facing the society today?

Amber: I think the number one issue facing society today is inequality.

Tyler: The loss of social capital. People are simply not involved in their communities anymore and I think that is harming society as a whole.

Christina: I would have to say that the biggest issue facing society today is racial tensions. Most problems today seem to concentrate around this particular issue.


Thank you for reading our Q&A! We appreciate you getting to know us and we hope to see you around the conference and at our student symposium. The student symposium is a free event where students will be able to discuss many relevant political and community issues. To register for this session, click HERE, and bring an open mind and a willingness to have a dialogue with other students. The symposium is a great opportunity to relax and get to the other students at the conference, and to learn valuable insights and skills from students across the country. This is an opportunity that should not be passed up!

2017 Street Law Community College  Faculty Development Seminar

2017 Street Law Community College Faculty Development Seminar

 

Street Law, Inc.—in collaboration with the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, the ABA Division for Public Education, and The Democracy Commitment—is offering a faculty development seminar for community college professors who are interested in developing a law-based civics program at their colleges. The program involves innovative classroom instruction and community-based learning.

Are you a community college faculty member or administrator? Are you (or would you like to be!) implementing a law and democracy course at your college?

Join us Sept. 22 to learn about the elements of Street Law’s Community College Program, the course curriculum, best practices in civic education instruction, and the positive impact the course can have on college students.

The seminar will be facilitated by Lee Arbetman, executive director of Street Law, Inc. and author of Street Law’s community college textbook, Street Law: Understanding Law and Legal Issues (McGraw-Hill Education, 2012).

Schedule:

8:30-9: Breakfast and check-in; 

9-3: Seminar (lunch will be served)

Cost:

$40 registration fee* to cover materials and meals

Register by clicking HERE.

For additional information about this Seminar, please contact Christine Lucianek at christine.lucianek@americanbar.org or 312-988-5737.

* Thanks to the generosity of the Robert R. McCormick Foundation, this registration fee is waived for professors from Chicagoland community colleges. A modest transportation stipend is also available for these professors.

Top 10 Things to Make the Most Out of CLDE 2017

Top 10 Things to Make the Most Out of CLDE 2017

Be sure to join us for the 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Meeting (#CLDE17) in Baltimore, Md. from June 7-10th. Early-bird rates end on Monday, May 1 and our group rate at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront is good through Tuesday, May 16.


1. Network with civic learning experts and specialists in the field.

Throughout the conference, but especially during the opening reception on Thursday, June 8th. Be sure to check out the Campus and Friends Showcase tables as well as the research and program-centered poster session!


2. Share resources and ideas at the two full-day pre-conference sessions.

Participate in either of the full day workshops on Wednesday, June 7:

  • Workshop 1: Engaged Campus Inventory focused on Charting a Course on the Pathway to Civic Engagement: An Inventory and Action Plan for Engaged Campuses (or)
  • Workshop 2: Assessment I & II on Civic Engagement Assessment Pre-Conference Workshops with Networking Lunch – sponsored by ETS

3. Connect with both peers and professionals engaged in higher education at five pre-conference sessions.

Participate in one or more of the half-day workshops on Wednesday, June 7:

  • Planning for Institution-Wide Data Collection on Civic and Community Engagement
  • Measures That Matter: Regarding Engaged Scholarship In Tenure and Promotion  
  • Dialogue and Democratic Deliberation: Moderator Training
  • Measuring Civic Outcomes During College, Educating for the Democracy We Want, Not the One We Have, and
  • Integrating Civic Responsibility into the Curriculum

4. Student leaders from campuses are encouraged to participate in space dedicated for students’ voice.

Our CLDE student interns from ADP, TDC and NASPA campuses have planned and prepared the Student Pre-Conference Workshop on Wednesday, June 7th in the afternoon​ starting at 1pm. It’s free for all student registrants to attend!


5. Attend all the collective Plenary Sessions – these are the most rewarding sessions for you to participate in while attending CLDE.

Thursday, June 8th    2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

OPENING PLENARY | CivEd Talks and Our CLDE Theory of Change

Friday, June 9th     9:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

PLENARY SESSION | Dialogue and Deliberation Forum: Safety and Justice: How Should Communities Reduce Violence?

Saturday, June 10th   9:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

PLENARY SESSION | The Theory of Our Work – Today and Tomorrow: What’s Next?


6. Experience both personal and professional growth.

Discover ways to get involved in planning for CLDE 2018. Contact Jen, Verdis or Stephanie for more information.


7. Coordinate with colleagues from across the country via NASPA, ADP, and TDC.

Break ???? with your colleagues on Thursday, June 8th at either the ADP, TDC or NASPA Lead Breakfast & Workshop sessions. Part of a balanced breakfast from 8:30 am-11:30 am.


8. Is your campus a Voter Friendly Campus? Join the Voter Friendly Campus Meeting on Saturday afternoon to learn how to best prepare your campus for upcoming midterm elections.

All campus participants who received the Voter Friendly Campus (VFC) designation are encouraged to attend; includes those interested in applying for 2019-2020.


9. Explore Baltimore and the DC area.

Participate in walking and bus tours on Wednesday, June 7th throughout Baltimore with experts from University of Maryland Baltimore County and Towson University or jump on the Metro into our nation’s capital, Washington, D.C.


10. Aspire to become an agent of change in your community.

Choose from a plethora of our concurrent sessions and mini-institutes to learn from our colleagues and sponsors interested in making a difference in our professional field. Take back new skills and tools for your campuses.

#CLDE17 FRIDAY PLENARY | Dialogue and Deliberation Forum- Safety and Justice: How Should Communities Reduce Violence?

Announcing the CLDE17 FRIDAY PLENARY | Dialogue and Deliberation Forum- Safety and Justice: How Should Communities Reduce Violence?

The 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Meeting, organized by the American Democracy Project (ADP), The Democracy Commitment (TDC) and NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education, will bring together faculty, student affairs professionals, senior campus administrators, students, and community partners to work to ensure that students graduate from our institutions prepared to be the informed, engaged citizens that our democracy needs.

Democratic dialogue and deliberation build civic capacities and consciences to tackle the highly salient and most complex wicked problems facing communities today.  It rejects the expert model of technical expertise and specialization towards a truly democratic framework of accessibility and empowerment. The practice of dialogue and deliberation cultivates student abilities necessary to explore enduring and multidisciplinary questions and solve persistent public problems. Thus, the capacities necessary for productive and meaningful dialogue and deliberation—critical thinking, emphatic listening, creative problem solving, ethical leadership, collaboration, issue framing—are not only essential for sustaining a vibrant democracy, they are the best preparation for our students/citizens/graduates to be successful in the 21st century.

Join us for the Friday plenary session and participate in a dialogue and deliberation forum with a conversation on applications and best practices.  

This plenary session will take place at 9:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. on Friday, June 9, 2017.

Dialogue and Deliberation Forum: Safety and Justice: How Should Communities Reduce Violence?

After falling steadily for decades, the rate of violent crime in the US rose in 2015 and 2016. Interactions between citizens and police too often end in violence. People are increasingly worried about safety in their communities. Many Americans are concerned something is going on with violence in communities, law enforcement, and race that is undermining the national ideals of safety and justice for all. Citizens and police need goodwill and cooperation in order to ensure safety and justice. Any possible option will require that we give up something we hold dear.  Each year the nonpartisan National Issues Forums Institute promotes public deliberations over some of the toughest issues that our communities and the nation face. Using briefing materials prepared by the  Kettering Foundation, this plenary will provide opportunities for people to consider the options and difficult choices that our communities and the nation must make if we are going to make progress together, and how to carry out this form of democratic practice in classrooms, campuses, and communities. This plenary session will provide attendees with hands-on, interactive experience in deliberative democracy that can be applied across higher education.  

Organizers: Kara Lindaman, Professor of Political Science, Winona State University (Minn.); John Dedrick, Vice-President, Kettering Foundation; William Muse, President Emeritus, National Issues Forum Institute; and John J. Theis, Executive Director, Center for Civic Engagement, Lone Star College (Texas).

Trained moderators are needed to assist in small group discussions; email: adp@aascu.org if you are able to serve as a table moderator.  There are also opportunities to be trained as a deliberative dialogue moderator:

  • April 29, 2017– 10:00 am to 2:00 pm at the AASCU offices in Washington, DC.  Click HERE for more information.  Deadline for registration has been extended to April 19, 2017.  
  • June 7, 2017– 9:00 am to 12:00 pm at the CLDE pre-conference workshop.  Click HERE for more information.

Also, there will be plenty of additional engagement opportunities during this year’s meeting such as:

  • CLDE Orientation on Thursday, June 8th prior to the start of the Opening Plenary.  
    • CivEd Talks on Thursday, June 8th during the Opening Plenary.
    • Campus & Friends Showcase at CLDE17 on Thursday, June 8th! Learn more here. Sign up here.
    • Exploratory Session by Bus | Right to the City – Curtis Bay: Community Engagement through a Mobile App Sponsored by Towson University.
    • Walking Tour 1 | Baltimore West Side Sponsored by University of Maryland Baltimore County.
    • Walking Tour 2 | Baltimore “Untour” Sponsored by University of Maryland Baltimore County.

To learn more about the 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Meeting and to register by the May 1, 2017 early-bird deadline, visit the conference website.

There is also a discounted hotel rate for meeting participants available at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront (700 Aliceanna St., Baltimore, Md., 21202). To obtain this rate, participants must book their room by Tuesday May 16, 2017. RESERVE ONLINE HERE

CLDE 2017: Two Full-Day Pre-conference Workshop Offerings

Did you know that there are two fantastic, full-day pre-conference workshops being held at the 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE) Meeting on Wednesday, June 7th? The first is perfect for campuses interested in advancing their strategic planning around civic and community engagement and/or applying for the next round of the Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement and the second is a set of two civic assessment workshops.

Check out the session descriptions below and be sure to register by May 1st for our early-bird rates.


Workshop 1: Engaged Campus Inventory
Wednesday, June 7 | 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. | Full-day Pre-conference Workshop
Charting a Course on the Pathway to Civic Engagement: An Inventory and Action Plan for Engaged Campuses

Organizer: Marshall Welch, Independent Scholar and author of Engaging Higher Education: Purpose, Platforms, and Programs for Community Engagement (2016)

This full day pre-conference institute is designed for teams from colleges and universities interested in strategic planning of their civic learning and democratic engagement efforts. This institute will provide not only the results of a comprehensive inventory of current practice and infrastructure to advance community engagement, but the “gift of time” for administrators to meet and work with their directors of campus centers for engagement to begin strategic planning for continued development of community engagement. This institute is designed for TWO individuals from each institution: the director of the campus center for community engagement (or staff responsible for CLDE work) and their immediate supervising administrator. The workshop is limited to 10 teams or 20 participants.

Participants will complete an online inventory in advance of the institute and receive their profile results onsite. The inventory can be accessed online and must be completed by May 1, 2017 in order to have the results ready for the workshop. The inventory takes about 30 minutes to complete.

Institutions that have received the Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement can access the inventory from this URL link: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1438026/promising-practice-and-infrastructure-2

Institutes that do NOT have the Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement can access the inventory from this URL link: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1348045/promising-practice-and-infrastructure-1

The morning half of the institute will provide an overview of the inventory and provide an overview of the instrument and the history of its development based on a 2013 research project conducted with the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE). The morning portion will continue with a presentation and review of the results from the inventory completed in advance. In this way workshop participants can compare the profile of their current operations with comparable institutions that have received the Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement.

Welch book coverPlease note: The fee for this institute includes lunch on Wednesday and is for a team of two people; it also includes one copy per team of the book Engaging Higher Education: Purpose, Platforms, and Programs for Community Engagement (Stylus, 2016). Whoever registers the team will be asked later to provide the name of the other team participant. A team of two people from the same institution must participate and include the lead campus civic engagement individual and their supervisor.

Price 240.00/team of two
Note: limited to 10 teams; first-come, first-served


Workshop 2: Assessment I & II
Wednesday, June 7 | 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Full-day Pre-conference Workshop: Civic Engagement Assessment Pre-Conference Workshops with Networking Lunch – sponsored by ETS

Organizers: H. Anne Weiss, Director of Assessment, Indiana Campus Compact and Assessment Specialist in Community Engagement, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis; and Ross Markle, Senior Research & Assessment Director, Global Higher Education Division, ETS

Attend both half-day assessment pre-conference workshops for a reduced price and participate in our assessment networking lunch from Noon – 1 p.m.

  • Planning for Institution-Wide Data Collection on Civic and Community Engagement (see below)
  • Measuring Civic Outcomes During College (see below)

Price for both: $120/person

9 a.m. – Noon | Half-day Morning Pre-conference Workshop
Planning for Institution-Wide Data Collection on Civic and Community Engagement
Most campuses are eager to answer the question “How are the students, faculty, and staff on campus working to address civic issues and public problems?” We will explore this question in this workshop by reviewing a range of strategies to assess community-engaged activities (i.e., curricular, co-curricular, or project-based activities that are done in partnership with the community). In addition to these many strategies, institutions also often approach assessment with a variety of lenses including assessment and evaluation of community outcomes, student outcomes, partnership assessment and faculty/staff engagement among others. In practice, campuses confront an array of challenges to align these approaches into a comprehensive data collection framework and infrastructure. This session will give participants tools, strategies, and information to design, initiate and/or enhance systematic mechanisms for monitoring and auditing community-engaged activities across your institution.
Price for just the morning workshop: $65/person

Noon – 1 p.m.  Networking Lunch

1 p.m. – 4 p.m. | Half-day Afternoon Pre-conference Workshop
Measuring Civic Outcomes During College
As institutions implement high impact practices across their campuses, learning outcomes, curricular and co-curricular activities, and assessment tools can often become disjointed. This workshop will guide attendees through a concentrated, cooperative process of unpacking and measuring civic outcomes such as civic identity, working with others to solve wicked problems, civic mindedness, and being an agent for social change. Ultimately, participants will articulate the alignment (and in some cases, mismatch) between outcomes, interventions, and assessment methods. Attendees should come with a specific program or course in mind and consider bringing a colleague with whom you can brainstorm transdisciplinary assessment practices. Transdisciplinary assessment means that faculty and staff from different disciplines or units on campus work jointly to develop new or innovative measurement practices from which informed decisions can be made to improve practices surrounding students’ civic learning and democratic engagement during college. Attendees will be introduced to the plethora of measurement tools that purport to assess students’ civic learning and development, such as: AAC&U VALUE Rubrics, Civic Minded Graduate Rubric 2.0, campus-wide survey instruments (ETS Civic Competency and Engagement, NSSE, CIRP Surveys, PRSI, etc.), and a host of other pre to post and retrospective pre to post scales such as social dominance orientation, belief in a just world, or the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. After this facilitated discussion, participants will have a chance to apply certain tools to student artifacts such as essays, digital stories, and eportfolios. Applying the tools to artifacts will allow for participants to evaluate and synthesize their plans for assessing student civic learning and development as it relates to participating in high impact practices during college. Price for just the afternoon workshop: $65/person

Be sure to register by May 1st for our best rates and book your hotel room by May 16 at our special group rate!

#CLDE17: Three Half-Day Pre-conference Workshops the Afternoon of June 7, 2017

During the 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE) Meeting, there are a variety of pre-conference sessions providing opportunities to hone in on our civic skills. On Wednesday, June 7th, consider attending one of the afternoon pre-cons geared toward measuring civic outcomes, educating for democracy, curriculum integration of civic responsibility, and a special civic workshop solely for students.

Check out the session descriptions below and be sure to register by May 1st for our early-bird rates.

Half-day Afternoon Pre-conference Workshops

Price: $65/person
Wednesday, June 7 | 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.  

  • Measuring Civic Outcomes During College

Organizers: H. Anne Weiss, Director of Assessment, Indiana Campus Compact and Assessment Specialist in Community Engagement, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis; and Ross Markle, Senior Research & Assessment Director, Global Higher Education Division, ETS

As institutions implement high impact practices across their campuses, learning outcomes, curricular and co-curricular activities, and assessment tools can often become disjointed. This workshop will guide attendees through a concentrated, cooperative process of unpacking and measuring civic outcomes such as civic identity, working with others to solve wicked problems, civic mindedness, and being an agent for social change. Ultimately, participants will articulate the alignment (and in some cases, mismatch) between outcomes, interventions, and assessment methods. Attendees should come with a specific program or course in mind and consider bringing a colleague with whom you can brainstorm transdisciplinary assessment practices. Transdisciplinary assessment means that faculty and staff from different disciplines or units on campus work jointly to develop new or innovative measurement practices from which informed decisions can be made to improve practices surrounding students’ civic learning and democratic engagement during college. Attendees will be introduced to the plethora of measurement tools that purport to assess students’ civic learning and development, such as: AAC&U VALUE Rubrics, Civic Minded Graduate Rubric 2.0, campus-wide survey instruments (ETS Civic Competency and Engagement, NSSE, CIRP Surveys, PRSI, etc.), and a host of other pre to post and retrospective pre to post scales such as social dominance orientation, belief in a just world, or the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. After this facilitated discussion, participants will have a chance to apply certain tools to student artifacts such as essays, digital stories, and eportfolios. Applying the tools to artifacts will allow for participants to evaluate and synthesize their plans for assessing student civic learning and development as it relates to participating in high impact practices during college.  

  • Educating for the Democracy We Want, Not the One We Have

Organizers: Nancy Thomas, Director, and Ishara Casellas Connors, Associate Director, Institute for Democracy & Higher Education (IDHE), Jonathan M. Tisch College for Civic Life at Tufts University (Mass.)  

After a long and contentious presidential election season, the election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the U.S. stunned faculty, administrators, and students. University presidents issued post-election statements calling for a wide range of responses ranging from tolerance and understanding to vigilance and the protection of democratic principles. Many academics chastised themselves for not making conservative perspectives on campus more visible prior to the election. Others felt they had not done enough to demand truth and statements about public controversies based on facts. National elections represent a teachable moment in college student learning. Over the past two years, the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education (IDHE) at Tufts University has been studying campus climates – the norms, structures, behaviors, and attitudes – for political learning and engagement in democracy. From that research, we’ve identified several attributes of campus climates that may be conducive to political learning for all students, not just a few. Using resources developed by IDHE, workshop participants will have an opportunity to examine what worked and what did not work on their campuses during the 2016 election season. Participants will also examine their political climates beyond election seasons, with particular attention to areas for growth. Participants will leave with new tools, language, and perspectives for educating the next generation of politically engaged students in the context of the current national and regional political landscape in the U.S.

  • Integrating Civic Responsibility into the Curriculum

Organizers: Gail Robinson, Education Consultant; Duane Oakes, Faculty Director, Center for Community & Civic Engagement, Mesa Community College (Ariz.); Emily Morrison, Assistant Professor, Sociology, and Director, Human Services and Social Justice Program, George Washington University (DC.); and Cathy Doyle, Director, Sarbanes Center for Public and Community Service, Anne Arundel Community College (Md.)

Community engagement and academic learning are central to higher education’s mission. Explore ways to help faculty, staff, and administrators prepare students for effective involvement in a diverse democratic society, and examine the role and obligation of higher education to produce good citizens. This interactive workshop features hands-on activities that include looking at service learning from charity and social justice perspectives; identifying appropriate reflection activities; analyzing course syllabi for elements of civic responsibility and civic engagement; reviewing syllabi from the perspectives of students, faculty, staff, administrators, and community partners; and integrating purposeful civic learning strategies into college courses.

Student Pre-Conference Workshop

For undergraduate students only and FREE!!

Organized by the 2017 CLDE Student Interns: Amber Austin, student, Tarrant County College (Texas); Tyler Ferrari, student, Chapman University (Calif.); and Christina Melecio, student, Winona State University (Minn.)  

This workshop will introduce students to #CLDEStuds17 that will provide a space to discuss issues that focus on being an active participant in the local and national communities, and will give students the tools to be effective activists in their communities. These open discussions will be held in large and small groups to effectively dissect the topics being discussed. To thoroughly accomplish our goals at the conference we hope that our peers come with open minds, and thoughtful ideas to contribute to discussions not only at this conference, but at home with their peers. There will be additional information closer to the conference for those who register. We hope to engage our attendees with new, and exciting, information that can further reach students across the nation, and actively enhance the Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement initiatives.
Be sure to register by May 1st for our best rates and book your hotel room by May 16 at our special group rate!

Call for Nominations: 2017 Bernie Ronan Award

About the Award

At the 2013 national meeting, The Democracy Commitment (TDC) announced that, starting in 2014, we would select for special recognition a student-initiated or -directed project or program that exemplifies the democratic skills and capacities we desire of our students.  Bernie Ronan was heralded as a champion of democratic education and for his tireless work as an organizer, advocate, leader and eloquent spokesman for community college students. As a profound theorist of democratic culture, he wrote about the significance of democratic engagement in the life of student. To this end, he co-founded The Democracy Commitment, a platform for the development and expansion of community college programs, projects and curricula aiming at engaging students in civic learning and democratic practice across the country. In 2016 we lost Bernie to his long battle with cancer, and to pay homage to his commitment to TDC and the development of community college students, TDC student scholarship award is now called the “Bernie Ronan Award,” as it will stand as a living testimony to this good and loyal friend.

The Award

The Bernie Ronan Award is presented annually to a student or a team of students from a TDC member institution for a student-initiated or student-directed project or program that exemplifies the democratic skills and capacities we desire of our students.  The award recipient(s)’ campus will receive a commemorative plaque to acknowledge the national recognition, and the award recipient will receive an award certificate and a check for $1,000.00 to be divided equally among the students identified by the campus coordinator as the effective participants in the project or program (If ten students were included in the nomination, each gets $100; if it is two students, each gets $500, etc.)  The award recipient(s) will be announced each year at The Democracy Commitment organizing session at the national meeting in June.

Criteria and Submission Process

Each TDC campus coordinator is invited to submit for consideration a student project or program from his or her institution that was aimed at addressing a significant political and/or social issue.  The project or program must demonstrate the democratic organizing skills of students and their leadership whereas the faculty/staff served mainly in an advisory or supporting role.

The nomination form must be filled out and submitted with all supporting materials and will include the following information:

  • Students’ names and contact information (email addresses and phone numbers).
  • Name of the project or program they were/are involved in.
  • A paragraph explaining the reason for the nomination, how the students’ project or program meets the required criteria, and why they should be selected.
  • You may attach up to four supporting documents, such as photos, news articles, video, etc. At least one supporting piece of documentation should be included for consideration.
Click HERE for a link to the Submission Form.

The nomination form should be sent electronically as a PDF along with all other nomination materials to Verdis Robinson, TDC National Director, robinsonv@aascu.org, no later than Friday, April 28, 2017.  It is our desire to announce the winners of the award no later than May 1, 2017.  For questions, please contact TDC National Office at (202) 478-4656.  Click HERE to visit the webpage.

Please note: At least one student from the selected team should plan to attend the 2017 CLDE meeting; one student from the selected team will have the registration fees for the meeting waived as part of the award. 

#CLDE17 OPENING PLENARY | CivEd Talks and Our CLDE Theory of Change

The 2017 Civic Learning & Democratic Engagement (CLDE) meeting organized by the American Democracy Project (ADP), the Democracy Project (TDC) and NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education, is continuing the conversation set forth during the #CLDE16 meeting  by introducing our emergent theory of change adapted from elements of the 2012  A Crucible Moment report. We encourage attendees to reflect on how to build campus cultures that enhance the following threads of our work: civic ethos, civic literacy and skill building, civic inquiry, civic action and civic agency.

This year’s conference will feature CivEd talks by three practitioner scholars making waves in the CLDE space. CivEd Talks are dynamic, short, and quick-paced presentations by members of the civic learning and democratic engagement community intended to inspire and challenge our collective imagination and thinking. Each of the three CivEd Talks presented will actively engage participants in stretching our thinking and motivating us to action as we return to our campuses and communities following the meeting.

Join us for an opening plenary session that asks you to envisioning the work of our CLDE movement in higher education and consider how you can help us move the needle on democratic engagement on campus, in your communities, and in our civil society. Each of the CivEd Talks presented will actively engage participants to challenge the status quo and to move toward change and to take action upon returning to their campuses.

The opening plenary session will take place at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, June 8, 2017.

Opening remarks by: Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).

CivEd Talks:

Millennial Conservatism and Civic Engagement: No, Really, What Do Young Conservatives Want?

Young conservatives are here to stay, and in 2016, they voted in higher numbers — and exhibited higher engagement with candidates and issues — than they had in the past 20 years. But millennial conservatives aren’t social conservatives, and they aren’t necessarily fiscal conservatives, either. Jane Coaston will review the latest polling data and analytics to discuss what we’re hearing — and not hearing — from a demographic that will impact our politics, and our policies, for decades to come. Speaker:  Jane Coaston, political reporter, MTV News


Doing Civic Engagement through a Wicked Problems Lens: The Case for Passionate Impartiality

Amid perhaps the most polarized time in our nation’s history, the quality of public discourse has also reached historic lows. Civic engagement practitioners must find ways to build capacity in our communities and campuses to change the dialogue, work against the overly adversarial climate, and support the kind of conversation democracy requires. Martin Carcasson will make the case for taking a “wicked problems” perspective on tough issues to work toward improving the quality of public discourse and building the necessary civic skill sets and mindsets in our students.
Speaker: Martín Carcasson, Founder and Director, Center for Public Deliberation, Colorado State University


Citizen Power

Far too many Americans are illiterate in power – what it is, how it operates, why some individuals have more than others. As a result, those few who do understand power wield it disproportionately. How can you learn to activate your civic power to see problems through fresh eyes and bypass broken institutions, stale ideologies, and divisive politics? Eric Liu answered this question in his recent book You’re More Powerful Than You Think: A Citizen’s Guide to Making Change Happen. In this talk about power and civic purpose, Eric Liu expounds the values, knowledge and skills of effective citizenship, and rejuvenates the meaning of being an active American. Speaker: Eric Liu, CEO, Citizen University

Eric Liu will be signing copies of his book You’re More Powerful Than You Think: A Citizen’s Guide to Making Change Happen (2017) after the plenary and everyone who registers will get a free copy of it onsite at the CLDE meeting registration desk.

 

 


There will be plenty of additional engagement opportunities during this year’s meeting such as:

  • CLDE Orientation on Thursday, June 8th prior to the start of the Opening Plenary.  
  • Campus & Friends Showcase at CLDE17 on Thursday, June 8th! Learn more here. Sign up here.
  • Exploratory Session by Bus | Right to the City – Curtis Bay: Community Engagement through a Mobile App Sponsored by Towson University.
  • Walking Tour 1 | Baltimore West Side Sponsored by University of Maryland Baltimore County.
  • Walking Tour 2 | Baltimore “Untour” Sponsored by University of Maryland Baltimore County.

To learn more about the 2017 Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement Meeting and to register by the May 1, 2017, early-bird deadline, visit the conference website.